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Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD)

VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD) This is a general discussion about A4/MkIV Jetta (99.5-~2005), Golf(99.5-2006), and New Beetle(98-2006). Both VE and PD engines are covered here.

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Old August 16th, 2018, 07:30   #76
starjays
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TDI(s): 2000 NB 5MT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by autdi View Post
Is this the same for the NB? 2000 has been blowing foam bits for a year now, A/C is meh, nearly no heat except on recirculate, so this needs doing. What I'm seeing are all Jetta or Golf models in the pictures and descriptions, and haven't looked at Bentley yet. The 2000 needs some love put into it, it's been the workhorse for a long time, but sits a lot more now that there are others newer around.

EDIT: Found a youtube video showing the procedure, looks similar enough to proceed cautiously.

Obviously this is a very old post, but did you happen to fix yours using the method described here?

I tore my entire dash apart, glove box, drivers side, the whole works, only to get everything removed and realize it looked nothing like the Golf/Jetta internals.

Ended up taking a dremel tool and cutting a rectangle in that first duct you see when you remove the radio/ac control cluster right up front. That gave me access to the blend door and after scraping up my hands and arms pretty bad putting tape on the doors, I used the same tape to patch-up the hole I cut and it's working like a charm so far. I would recommend taking some of the tape and putting it over the rough plastic where the hole was cut, as it makes it less painful on the arms/hands.

Anyway there's a couple "hack job" youtube videos I saw, and near as I can tell this is the best way to do it, short of removing literally the entire dash, steering wheel, etc.
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Old January 6th, 2019, 15:17   #77
VincenzaV
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Default Foam party over!

I finally did my foam elimination in the AC box. Luckily the front cover came off with gentle persuasion and no cutting. However, a few trim pieces are cracked around the screw holes. A thing that comes with age I guess. The part where you put the tape on really does take a while if you have man hands...
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Old January 11th, 2019, 14:00   #78
JettaTDIBlack
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Originally Posted by Chunlicious View Post
So, I was able to do this repaid on a 2003 MK4 Jetta 1.8T. Here is a video that should help if someone is still a bit confused. I could not find one like this. Took my under 4 hours + trip to Home Depot.

https://youtu.be/bxPMzzLmEuM
What did you get at Home Depot? Just the a/c tape or did you find foam there too?

dubrs.com
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Old January 16th, 2019, 19:50   #79
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I did the AC tape. 3M brand I believe. Too hard to reach all the old foam from the front but 99% is done blowing in my face. So glad its done....
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Old January 19th, 2019, 14:22   #80
flash9
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Lightbulb

We were getting the dreaded foam out of the vents, so I decided the tackle this problem, but I really found very little details on getting into the center HVAC plenum. There are plenty of instructions on how to get far enough into the center dash area to see the center air plenum as shown below:


So, this will pick up from this point. There appeared to be two paths to take, just unsnapping the plenums front covers seven snaps, or finding the two 6mm screws and removing the front and back plenum together.
I decided to remove the two 6mm screws and try to remove the whole plenum.
Here is the location of the right hand side screw.

I was not able to get to it from this angle (basically the space where the glove box typically occupies) but I was able to get to it through the center opening.






Here is a little more clear view of the tools setup that was able to reach the right hand side of the plenums screw.



The left hand side screw is location directly across from the right hand side’s screw. Here is how I accessed it.



For the left hand side screw it took a slightly different tool configuration.



At this point I stared to pull on the plenum and realized I would not be able to get it out with the two half’s snapped together, so I started to work on separating the two pieces.
I found the bottom snap and a trick to help unsnap the cover was to stick a flat bladed screw driver in the slot to open it up a little and then I was able to unsnap it.



I did the snap opening trick on a few of the other six snaps and I was able to get the cover removed.
NOTE: I also found that by removing the two screws, it allowed the whole plenum to shift a little left and right to get better access to the three snaps on each side.
Here is a “back side” view of the front plenum cover once it was removed.



I forgot to get a picture of the plenum with just the front cover removed (and before the foam was removed), but for a point of reference here is the opening you would need to work through if you choose to not remove the back half of the plenum.



The Red Box is the opening you would need to work through if you do not remove the back piece of the plenum, and the Green Box is the approximate opening of you choose to remove the back piece.


Continued:
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Last edited by flash9; January 21st, 2019 at 05:56.
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Old January 19th, 2019, 14:25   #81
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Lightbulb Continued

It is kind of a pain to get out, but if you have come this far it is well worth removing the back part of the plenum to get better access to be able to remove the foam and repair the dampers.
Since we have already removed the two screws we now just need to get a flat screw driver or something else to prey the clip down and off this bottom lip.



I figured at this point the back piece would just drop right down and out, but in my case it was not so simple. I had to really struggle to get it to drop down and out. One positive thing with this struggle was seeing exactly how this piece went up and into the upper portion of the plenum. There are three little tabs dropping down from the upper plenum that you should feel for to make sure that they are on the same location when putting everything back together. Sorry no picture. But here is an overall view with everything removed.



Here is a picture of the back side of the rear plenum housing. I have to think the tab that I have highlighted in the red box in the image below was what was keeping this part from coming out easily. Note, that the foam gasket on the back was in good condition, but the upper gray gasket shown in the photo, I installed after removing the rotted foam one that was there originally. I also installed new foam gasket material on the front plenum cover as well.



There are plenty of good discussions on foam vs aluminum duct tape, so I will not go into that, but I did want to highlight one part of the rear damper door that I nearly missed. See the boxed area in the photo below.


Here is my completed dampers after cleaning them off and installing the aluminum duct tape. Make sure you reach your finger through the holes and remove as much or the foam from the back side as you can. I was unable to apply the tape on the back side but getting foam off is important step.



I am still in the process of putting it all back together. I am taking the time to scrub and clean all of the parts before putting it all back together.
I hope this help others in tackling this job. I would rate this an 8 out of 10 in pain in the back side, but I am glad I am doing it. I am also glad I have a garage and plenty of time to do the project. ie we have extra cars.
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Last edited by flash9; January 19th, 2019 at 14:37.
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Old January 19th, 2019, 20:11   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flash9 View Post
There are plenty of good discussions on foam vs aluminum duct tape, so I will not go into that, but I did want to highlight one part of the rear damper door that I nearly missed. See the boxed area in the photo below.
For the foam piece you replaced, where did you get it?
If VW do you have the part# handy.
I may be doing this in the future.

It looks like you are not removing the back of the case so you did not drain the coolant or evacuate the AC?

About how many hours do you have into it so far?
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Old January 20th, 2019, 07:03   #83
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For the foam piece you replaced, where did you get it?
If VW do you have the part# handy.
I may be doing this in the future.

It looks like you are not removing the back of the case so you did not drain the coolant or evacuate the AC?

About how many hours do you have into it so far?

I used some Frost King Weatherseal that I already had, but I am sure you can find it right near were you find the Aluminum Duct Tape.



Here are a couple pictures of both plenum half's from before I removed the old foam and installed the new foam.







I am taking my time, and pretty much finished up this morning, but I would estimate it has taken 5-6 hours.
Having the proper tools makes all the difference.
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Last edited by flash9; January 20th, 2019 at 07:06.
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Old January 21st, 2019, 03:21   #84
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flash- great pictures. Thx for posting and helping add to the DIY.
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Old January 22nd, 2019, 07:30   #85
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With the age of these Mk4's you might as well pull the entire dash and HVAC system so you can repair both of the doors and replace the AC and heater cores, the heater core may start leaking soon. My 2000 Jetta heater core is starting to leak.
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Old March 20th, 2019, 01:08   #86
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would this also cause poor cooling while AC is on? I'm almost 100% positive that my blend doors are now bare metal (with those stupid holes). No temp control, blowing from ventss at all times (even when on dash or floor is selected). I have warm heat (not "HOT") and zero AC (also, my AC may not be properly charged as the fans don't come on when I turn the AC on. I know it's paid for but, dang, I'm sick of these little grimlins that seem to plague the VW brand. Don't get me wrong....I love the little bugger but the engineering or certain systems is rather questionable. I know the original bugs were manufactured in Germany, but, the new bettles are coming out of Mexico correct?
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Old March 20th, 2019, 04:53   #87
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I know it's paid for but, dang, I'm sick of these little grimlins that seem to plague the VW brand. Don't get me wrong....I love the little bugger but the engineering or certain systems is rather questionable. I know the original bugs were manufactured in Germany, but, the new bettles are coming out of Mexico correct?
Most of the MKIVs came off the assembly line in Mexico- I'd suggest there are no quality differences between those and the cars from Germany (some have argued the Puebla vehicles are better). I'd also say that most cars have their gremlins, they just vary by make. I certainly don't drive VWs based on claims of reliability (although the MKIV ALH is incredibly reliable). As for your blend doors, how long did they go without problems? 15 years? That's not bad. I'd replace the foam and use it as an opportunity to combo some other projects.
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Old July 11th, 2019, 14:37   #88
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Talking Blend Air Door Bushing

I recently went through the pain of repairing my blend air door using aluminum HVAC tape & replacing the bushing that rotates the blend air door in my 2001 Jetta TDi (the LAST VW I'll ever own).


The original bushing that is rotated by the temperature control push arm had worn to the point it wouldn't stay up in the housing & therefore it wouldn't rotate the blend air door. There's a tab on the bottom of the blend air door that protrudes downward into the housing; that tab is supposed to be captured in a slot in the top of the blend air bushing when the bushing is inserted upward into the housing. After years of use, the bushing tends to wear & fall out of the housing, rendering the blend air door immobilized & useless.


I acquired an aftermarket bushing from KansasCityTDi.com. Initially I had problems getting the new busing to fit onto the blend air door tab. To solve this, I folded a small piece of 400 grit sandpaper in half with the grit sides out & used that folded edge of the sandpaper to open up/smooth the insides of the gap which the blend air door inserts into. The fit of the new bushing into the housing was very snug & I was happy about that, but getting the blend air door tab inserted into the slot of the new bushing was a real pain. It took a combination of wiggling the blend air door with a magnet in my left hand while reaching under the dash & rotating the new bushing up into the housing. Finally I was able to feel the door tab insert into the bushing slot and push the bushing up to it's home position. This was done with the lever arm that attaches to the bushing disconnected; once I had the door tab & bushing coupled, I reattached the lever arm & put the 7mm screw back in place with a 7mm box end (ignition) wrench.
To insure that the bushing stays in the housing, I wedged a wooden block below the bushing & above the floor vent on the passenger side. I drilled a shallow hole in the top of the block for the 7mm screw head to ride in, and captured the block to the floor vent with a strip of perforated plumbers strap & a couple of wood screws. Cold & hot air at the twist of a knob....again!! My thanks to all who've contributed to this DIY/Sticky & helped me solve ANOTHER needless problem with this MY LAST VW.



I've included some photos to help with the text explanation. If the link doesn't work, email me directly.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/TaKRbrSfdyaQNbTZ6





Last edited by rmidgett; July 11th, 2019 at 14:39. Reason: URL for photos
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Old October 2nd, 2019, 18:32   #89
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Just did the blend door fix. Unfortunately, I still have poor cooling. Just posted a thread on it if anyone has any suggestions how I can proceed.

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=502433
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