www.tdiclub.com

Economy - Longevity - Performance
The #1 Source of TDI Information on the Web!
Forums Articles Links Meets
Orders TDI Club Cards TDIFest 2016 Gone, but not forgotten VAG-Com List Unit Conversions TDIClub Chat Thank You

Order your TDIClub merchandise and help support TDIClub


Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas

VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas Discussions area for A5/MkV Jetta/Golf (2005/2006 PD and 2009 CR).

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 8th, 2014, 16:36   #46
MPG MASTERS 1
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Florida
Fuel Economy: At least 20% better then stock
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperJ View Post
Are you trying to match your N75 duty cycle to actuator position? I don't think that's possible. Your vacuum readings sound spot on for open and close (if you were hitting full close stop (high N75 duty cycle) at less than 18" then it would seem like you should shorten the shaft. If you run the boost control output test (the one that holds the rpm at 1400 and opens and closes the vanes), I think it recalibrates the actuator feedback. You should always run it once more after the adjustment (tie wrap, is done) to ensure calibration is accurate.
=
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperJ View Post
Are you trying to match your N75 duty cycle to actuator position? I don't think that's possible. Your vacuum readings sound spot on for open and close (if you were hitting full close stop (high N75 duty cycle) at less than 18" then it would seem like you should shorten the shaft. If you run the boost control output test (the one that holds the rpm at 1400 and opens and closes the vanes), I think it recalibrates the actuator feedback. You should always run it once more after the adjustment (tie wrap, is done) to ensure calibration is accurate.
=Not sure I follow all you are saying. Vacuum movement does seem okay. However, tha Vag said it was requesting 80, 80what? %? but the actuator was at 103, %? That would maybe indicate a weak spring in the actuator?
That is when I installed a new EGR cooler to stop the smallest exhaust leak. (Should have welded to in the full open position and welded it from ever leaking again)

Then the mech said the spread (80-103) distance was less from what it was requesting but still off some because he said the turbo rod hole shaft that drives the vanes had some exhaust coming from it so he did NOT adjust the stop up a little. I have talked to many turbo shops and they all say a little exhaust will come out that clearance area under max spool up. (especally oif you have any "back pressure" from you cat or exhaust.) Mine in under 1psi at rpms under 2000 and builds up to 3.5-4 psi at WOT. They say thats normal.

But my question is what about the inbetween vane rod settings? I want to shorten the shaft a little and see what the boost does. If the vanes are a little worn, maybe the shorter position will take up the slack, (if indeed their is any slack to take up)

About the "boost control output test", not sure how to do that and will have to read up on it and see if the mech can complete that while he resets the stop and hopefully the vane rod adjustment.

Let me ask you guys. Is the boost uesd in calculating the fuel delivery to the injectors or is it only a throttle position sent to the ECU ECM telling it to dump more fuel into the combustion chamber?

I am trying to figure out why my instant MPG on the MFD goes into the single digits when normally starting out in first and very slowly increases into the teens in 2nd-3rd and only when in 5th at cruise when the power is backed off does it then stabalize at high MPG numbers again. 60+ Almost seems like a normal asperated acceleration but I do have good boost with no leaks. Only have 104,000 and don't think my injectors are bad nor my turbo. Need to know what actually feeds the proper amount of fuel to the engine.

Thanks
__________________
MPG MASTERS 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2014, 11:46   #47
325_Guy
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: West Central Texas
TDI(s): MkV Jetta
Default

For those of you that have done this cooler leak repair with the Quicksteel, any updates on the effectiveness?
__________________
2006 BRM Jetta- 310k and counting
Malone Stage 1.5 w/ EGR Delete
OEM HIDs, GLI Front Grille, OEM GTI LED Tails, Bosal Hitch
Current Project- MIB2 w/ Navigation
325_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 27th, 2014, 08:06   #48
MPG MASTERS 1
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Florida
Fuel Economy: At least 20% better then stock
Default

Worked great and acts as a bushing but still leaks a small amount of exhaust.

Who really needs that valve to function anyway. As long as it is open, your okay.
If I had to do it again, I would mix some other epoxy with the Quicksteel and make sure the flapper valve was in the wide open position and epoxy the shaft so it was completely air tight. Or heli-arc it. lol
__________________
MPG MASTERS 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2014, 09:16   #49
whodom
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Salters, SC
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by supak111 View Post
IMPORTANT NOTES:
Mix the 2 part guiksteel really good but fast, it hardens really really fast. I CAN'T stress this enough. On my first try it hardened on me and I only filled half the hole so I had to get all the stuff out which was super super hard once this stuff hardens. SO MIX FAST but well (60 sec max) then fill the hole asap. Also it helps to have the metal part made already as you can use it to push the quiksteel up into the hole... Doesn't look great but works great, I'll update everyone if this doesn't last long as I'm not sure 500F rating is good enough.

I am about to try this repair on my 2006 Jetta (at 132k miles) and here's something I hope will help. The curing rate of epoxy is greatly affected by its temperature. You can speed up the curing rate by applying heat (heat lamp, hair dryer or heat gun) after the epoxy is in place; therefore you can also SLOW the curing rate by pre-cooling the two epoxy components. I plan on putting the stuff in the refrigerator while I get the car ready; hopefully this will slow the hardening process down sufficiently to give ample time to work the epoxy into place.

The only possible downside I see is that it may be difficult to mix when it's cold. I'll post an update and let everyone know how it works out.

Hugh
2006-1/2 Jetta TDI Diesel Edition
whodom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 13th, 2014, 16:14   #50
whodom
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Salters, SC
Default

Well, I repaired my leaky valve today. I tried refrigerating the epoxy ahead of time, which turned out to hinder, rather than help the process. It seemed to be slower to begin curing, but in the end the overall time to cure was about the same. The trouble with this was it stayed runny until shortly before it set up completely, which made it impossible to get a substantial amount into the cavity around the shaft. After 1 try like that, I let the stuff warm up and then mixed it.

In my case, I found I had to wait at least 2 minutes before the epoxy set up enough that it could be worked into the valve. This gave less than 2 minutes working time to get it into place. I wound up applying it 4 or 5 times to get the cavity filled.

It's not pretty, but it seems to be holding. Fingers crossed.

If I had it to do over, I think I'd use a "putty" type epoxy like this: http://www.pcepoxy.com/our-products/...fahrenheit.php I've used their product "PC7" before and it would be much easier to get into the valve and shape before it set up. If anyone else tries this job, I'd highly recommend using a putty type epoxy rather than a semi-liquid like Quicksteel.

Hugh
2006-1/2 Jetta TDI Diesel Edition

Last edited by whodom; October 14th, 2014 at 07:17.
whodom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 18th, 2014, 10:55   #51
gersonortuno
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: USA
TDI(s): 98 JETTA
Default

Thank you very much for your info, I've tried this fix and is working great,over 5K mi.
gersonortuno is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2014, 21:04   #52
ersteinwehr
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: ND
Default

I have 10k miles on my car since making this fix and it continues to run just like it used to.
ersteinwehr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27th, 2014, 10:09   #53
nmea2020
Veteran Member
 
nmea2020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: N.W. Florida
Default

I also now have success with this fix and made a SS PLATE to help support the QUICKSTEEL

It wouldn't bother me if i had to do it every two years...EASY FIX
__________________
2010 SILVER JETTA TDI DSG 120K MILES GOING BACK to VW
2005.5 Charcoal JETTA TDI DSG Package 1 173K Miles (my ride)But the wife took it over
RIP 2006 Wheat Biege Jetta TDI 5speed 151K PACKAGE 0 w/Sirius, SCAN GAUGE II, VAG-COM USB, Key FOB Windows(Her car)
nmea2020 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 27th, 2014, 10:49   #54
bondtimbond
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Houston Texas
Default

Regarding the posts by "whodom" about using putty epoxy versus a more liquid type: The Quick Steel epoxy that I pictured in my original posting on 8/7/14 is a putty, so I am confused about your comments indicating it isn't. Maybe QuickSteel comes in more than one consistancy? What I used is a log of two part clay epoxy that you cut with a knife and then knead together to mix. It is the consistancy of clay. It does however set quickly, but I was able to perform the entire repair with one layer below the reinserted clip and one layer above it.

So far I have not heard any sign of the hiss, but when I get under the car for my next oil change in a few days I plan to inspect the repair more closely and see how it is holding up.

By the way nmea2020, your plate looks great! I agree that such a plate will only improve the chances of an epoxy repair lasting longer.
__________________
____________________________________
2006 Jetta Mk5 June build Package 2 Auto - sold in Oct 2019

Last edited by bondtimbond; October 27th, 2014 at 10:52.
bondtimbond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2014, 11:51   #55
whodom
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Salters, SC
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bondtimbond View Post
Regarding the posts by "whodom" about using putty epoxy versus a more liquid type: The Quick Steel epoxy that I pictured in my original posting on 8/7/14 is a putty, so I am confused about your comments indicating it isn't. Maybe QuickSteel comes in more than one consistancy? What I used is a log of two part clay epoxy that you cut with a knife and then knead together to mix. It is the consistancy of clay. It does however set quickly, but I was able to perform the entire repair with one layer below the reinserted clip and one layer above it.
I guess I didn't read closely enough. The Quick Steel I purchased (at Advance Auto Parts IIRC) came in two tubes, just like JB Weld. When mixed, it remained very runny; about like slightly warm honey. I'm sure it is a MUCH easier job with the putty version.

Still, my repair seems to be holding up. I never noticed a hiss (my hearing is not that great), but I was noticing the exhaust smell in the car. That is 99% gone.

Hugh (whodom)
whodom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 08:39   #56
subdvr99
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Mystic, CT
Default

OK, any updates on this fix after a few more months? I have been procrastinating doing anything with my leaky valve, but enough is enough. Either this, a delete, or a replacement....

Thanks!
__________________
2006 VW Jetta TDI BRM 5M, (SOLD!)
subdvr99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 08:48   #57
MPG MASTERS 1
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Florida
Fuel Economy: At least 20% better then stock
Default

That fix was easy to do but you had to work VERY FAST or the epoxy would set up.
The valve still had a little leak around the shaft becaus there is no seal so the Mechanics suggested replacing with new cooler which is what I ended up doing. BUT, in hind sight, I should have removed the butterfly valve and heli arced the open area shut. Who needs the valve? I would think you could also put the valve in an fixed open position and weld the shaft and open area totally shut. I think Fanko6 does the removal of the flap and welds the shaft hole shut for $75. (I think)
__________________
MPG MASTERS 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 12:46   #58
325_Guy
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: West Central Texas
TDI(s): MkV Jetta
Default

I have over 12,000 miles of driving on my repair with no signs of leaking or degradation of the repair.

To piggyback off of the post above mine, I came to a similar conclusion- who needs the valve, and I used a dremel to cut the shaft off as far inside the housing as I could reach. That way I would be filling a hole instead of trying to form all the sealing material around the shaft. Instead of using the quicksteel epoxy referenced in this thread, I found something called furnace cement and used that instead. Part# FSC16 at Tractor Supply Company for anyone that is interested. This was MUCH easier to apply from underneath the car, as it is a thick, spreadable putty (similar to drywall spackle), designed to seal metal-to-metal joints, and is rated to 2700*F. It needs about an hour to harden and then needs to be cured at around 500*F, I used a propane torch to carefully accomplish this. To top it all off, like others have done I made a sheetmetal blockoff plate that I installed over the repair using the stock bolts.
325_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 15:34   #59
supak111
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: midwest
Default

I don't know how many miles on my TDI since I stated this thread but mine still holds great.

I just looked into that Furnace Cement FSC16 and it definitely looks like a better choice, especially since it doesn't harder in 5 minutes like the putty I originally used which isn't enough time. I just wouldn't cut the shaft off, I'm sure it holds better with it cut but then you don't have the functionality and might get a check engine light?

Def never expected this many people to try this when I first posted it, I though people would give me crap for this hack job lol. Glad it helped though.
.
.
__________________
★★ Signature: Hide Plate Gadget: 007LicensePlate.com ★★

supak111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 16:46   #60
325_Guy
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: West Central Texas
TDI(s): MkV Jetta
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by supak111 View Post
I just wouldn't cut the shaft off, I'm sure it holds better with it cut but then you don't have the functionality and might get a check engine light?
.
No CEL. I had some concerns as well about impacting the EGR functionality or setting a CEL but the only function the EGR cooler serves is to transfer heat from the exhaust gases into the engine coolant. From what I understand, this helps with engine warm up times in extreme cold operating conditions. The core exhaust gas recirculation function is not affected by the positioning of the diverter valve. In fact, there is no ECM feedback for the positioning of the EGR diverter valve- whether it is sending gases straight through to the intake or into the heat exchanger, all of the requested exhaust gas makes it back into the intake and the ECM has no idea the actual position of the vacuum-controlled valve.

Honestly if I had the mechanical know-how and the $$$, I'd make a sort of "EGR straight pipe", basically delete the EGR cooler portion out of the mix while keeping the EGR system intact. I'm surprised nobody has marketed this.
325_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hissing/leaking EGR cooler fixed! cujet VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas 155 April 12th, 2018 05:59
Inexpensive TDI EGR Cooler Flapper Valve Leak Fix TDI_Farmer TDI 101 15 April 26th, 2016 13:46
2006 - Hissing sound, blown EGR cooler valve, help? Diesel lifer VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas 70 June 30th, 2014 20:48
BRM Hissing EGR Cooler - Fix w/Malone Tune? cakins VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas 11 April 10th, 2014 08:25
Hissing sound when accelerating. EGR Cooler? hid3 VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas 12 July 12th, 2010 09:34


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:35.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright - TDIClub Online LTD - 2017
Contact Us | Privacy Statement | Forum Rules | Disclaimer
TDIClub Online Ltd (TDIClub.com) is not affiliated with the VWoA or VWAG and is supported by contributions from viewers like you.
1996 - 2017, All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.18344 seconds with 11 queries
[Output: 135.42 Kb. compressed to 114.33 Kb. by saving 21.08 Kb. (15.57%)]