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VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas Discussions area for A5/MkV Jetta/Golf (2005/2006 PD and 2009 CR).

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Old February 24th, 2018, 20:20   #16
relumalutan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate660 View Post
Just letting you guys know I finished up the project starts and runs just fine drove it 200 miles today and changed the oil. No more lope in the intake noise. Proved all you 200 dollar timing tool mechanics wrong.... so If anyone wonders if you can do it without them yes it most certainly is possible
Certainly possible, as you say. It all depends on the amount of risk one is willing to take. Taking in consideration the potential damage and repairing costs if something goes wrong by using the mark and pray method..... I would rather invest in a set of timing belt tools.
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Old February 24th, 2018, 21:47   #17
banshee365
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Originally Posted by Nate660 View Post
Just letting you guys know I finished up the project starts and runs just fine drove it 200 miles today and changed the oil. No more lope in the intake noise. Proved all you 200 dollar timing tool mechanics wrong.... so If anyone wonders if you can do it without them yes it most certainly is possible
FWIW you didnít prove sh**. Just because it runs doesnít mean that itís done correctly as it would be right the right tools.
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Old February 25th, 2018, 04:52   #18
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FWIW you didn’t prove sh**. Just because it runs doesn’t mean that it’s done correctly as it would be right the right tools.
Matter of fact smarta** it is done right. I own a 2004 evo 8 had the block pulled out because of a connecting rod thrown out and put my head on a new short block and installed it all and had it back in and running. I’m a more of torque down everything and attention to detail. Ignorant people like you are the reason people don’t like posting on forums. Hop off this post with useless nonsense
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Old February 25th, 2018, 07:40   #19
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What did your torsion value end up at after doing it without the proper tools?
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Old February 25th, 2018, 12:44   #20
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The procedures outlined for cam & tb replacement were created by the desgner of the engine.
This procedure target is accuracy, repeatability and productivity (timewise) under a foolproof focus.
They require the use of specific tools that in the end help guarantee a good result. They make life easier.

This is because among the various things that can go wrong include the destruction of the engine.
Can it be done in a diferent way? Of course. But for one that had success there are 10+ who failed.

Last edited by Carlos_TJ; February 25th, 2018 at 12:49.
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Old March 1st, 2018, 18:20   #21
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Originally Posted by narongc73 View Post
Good sales pitch. OP, Frank is not the end all be all. I've yet to see any data on his cams reliability. Make your own decision.
I don't think you know anything about me, narongc. Although I do 'pitch' my own products, the ones who own my products pitch them more than I do. I consider reputation important and it shows in my product line. There are two mantras that if you apply them, you eliminate the question marks for sub-par workmanship.

"Do it once and do it right"
"Build it like your gonna buy it"

The small proof we have is over 2000 cam kits sold, with over 350 personally installed. We have a grand total of 7 failures, 4 from operator error (loss of oil or water) and those have been returned to service. Of the three remaining cams, one was grenaded racing, one used 507.00 5-30 oil(wrong stuff) for 234,000 miles and only one, we have no good reason it failed.

We designed many facets of the cam kit, including the reusable bolts, the cam bearing mod, our own cam design and with a little help from our friends, the method to set torsion value.

It is very correct to say I am actually in a 'hobby gone wild' business, that I did for my own benefit before I performed as a business. We have a penchant for getting it right and pulling out all the stops to tweak improvements until we can't find any more.

Nate 660: Our interest in getting the right parts and the right service is not a point of argument. I certainly find the 'paint and pray' method has one big problem. It's harder to do. That's all. We loan the tools and it makes the job not only easier, but safer. Also, if you were to listen to someone like me, who not only builds the parts, but has many improved methods for installation, you would be better for it. I know where all the pitfalls are.

Even after you have the belt into position, you still have to set the torsion value and that is not guess work. That requires the use of the VCDS or equivalent. Your car may run, but in order to get it to run at peak efficiency, there are three values to set in the engine module. 1) torsion value in block 4, 2) liter per hour fuel usage in block 15 and 3) injector balance in block 13.

These three values, which you cannot possibly set by guessing, give you the parameters to get the highest fuel economy and injector balance numbers for your engine. There is no 'one number' that is correct for torsion value (cam to timing belt position), but a movement as small as .5+/- can make 4 mpg difference.

So, if you prefer to get the best out of your engine, it will pay you to learn what I know.

The next thing is the cam itself. We designed a cam that adds $400 to the cost of rebuilding the PD motor, with the purpose of not doing it again any time soon. We have a LOT of people that have exceeded 250,000 additional miles and say it looks like it's still breaking in. Our mileage king at the moment is 440,000 additional miles.

I am not going to give you grief for using your imagination to get the job done, but we also loan the tools, so forget $200(some of those tools are unnecessary), it's more like $30 loaner fee and well worth the cost.

Next thing... wouldn't you like to know how to do the job without removing the engine mounts and having to support the engine with a support or jack? We developed that idea, too. It makes the job safer, cheaper and quicker.

If you installed one of the many stock aftermarket cams, it is likely that your life-expectancy will be shorter than you would hope for. I recommend you check for galling on the base circle of the cam lobes in 25,000 miles and if it makes it that far, again at 50,000 miles. That is the first indicator of the cam wearing out. Too many fail to make 100,000, which is a shame.

And don't bite on the baloney about 'billet'. Virtually every single cam sold today, Febi, Estes, Kolbenschmidt, Estas, AMC(Although a poor copy) and several more, are the same billet design. There is one reason they are all billet: It's cheaper to build and as effective as a cast steel cam.

I wish you good luck with your build, but you do need to follow some good advice. It will help you.

For the less fluent: If your point requires asterisks, you don't have a very good argument.
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Last edited by Franko6; March 1st, 2018 at 18:32.
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Old March 2nd, 2018, 03:36   #22
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Can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make them drink. In fact, a lot of times when you try, you realize that horse you've been leading is just an ass.
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Old March 2nd, 2018, 05:52   #23
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I have encountered a mark and pray once on a Rover diesel. After I fixed the timing it started first time without pressing the gas 10 times. You should at least check torsion values on these. Do it right or don't do it.
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