www.tdiclub.com

Economy - Longevity - Performance
The #1 Source of TDI Information on the Web!
Forums Articles Links Meets
Orders TDI Club Cards TDIFest 2016 Gone, but not forgotten VAG-Com List Unit Conversions TDIClub Chat Thank You




Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW Passat Family (NMS and B7) TDIs (2012+)

VW Passat Family (NMS and B7) TDIs (2012+) Discussion area for the 2012+ Passat TDI (North American and rest of world versions versions). The North American model was previously codenamed NMS (New Midsize Sedan) and the version the rest of the world gets is sometimes referred to as B7.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old March 26th, 2016, 06:55   #1
nord
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southern Tier NY
Default Easy Coolant Flush

After a new heater core on my '14 SE I decided I better check our '13 SEL. Sure enough... Orange instead of pink. Based on some of the lessons learned while working on my SE and my distaste (literally) for coolant because it seems to migrate everywhere, I decided to experiment. I wanted to work totally from the top side of the car and not disturb any of the main plumbing.

So... Facing the car and just to the right of the air intake is the main return hose to the radiator. Just above that and on the hose neck is a small rubber hose that goes directly to the coolant reservoir. Release the clamp and prepare to pull the small hose.

I found that our shop vac hose is almost an exact fit for the reservoir. Remove the cap, place the hose, and fire up the vacuum. Remove the small hose from the neck and plug it by holding your finger over it. The result will be a turbulent backwash within the reservoir. Sediment and contaminated coolant will be pulled out of the system.

Once the coolant had been removed, then it's distilled water time. Just add it back through the reservoir until liquid dribbles out the open hose fitting. Put the small hose back in place and run the engine a bit or take the car for a short drive. (Make sure the engine comes up to operating temp.) Repeat the vacuum operation. After about three repeats you'll see pure water coming out the hose fitting with no hint of coolant. (Don't forget to clean the residue out of the reservoir. I'll almost guarantee the internal reservoir will be coated with a skim of orange.)

Vacuum the system down one more time. Very little water will be left in the system once done. Add about a quart of straight new coolant followed by a 50/50 mix to the reservoir. The heavy 100% coolant will displace the remaining water forcing it out the hose fitting. It's easy to monitor. Though it will seem to take a rather long time the pure water will rather suddenly turn pink. Let it run for just a bit and bring the reservoir to full. Make sure the small hose is back in place and run the car up to operating temp. Very little "burping" (if any) will be needed.

Check the specific gravity of the coolant for temp protection. In my case the mix was perfect. 400 miles on the car immediately after the change yesterday. Coolant is bright pink and no need to add even though I did have a reserve with me.

Oh... No HOAT on my skin or clothing. No "funny" taste in my mouth and a shop vac about half full of used coolant. This I dumped into a pail for recycling. No "chunks", just worn out coolant with an orange cast.

Once I saw what the vacuum was doing to coolant in the reservoir I was pretty much sold on the effectiveness of the procedure. It's sort of amazing to watch. I'd suggest having about five gallons of distilled water on hand and you'll be able to see when things really begin to clean up. Tools needed? A vac and a pair of pliers. It's that easy.

Note: What you'll observe within the reservoir is almost violent as the vac does its work. Don't be alarmed. Do, though, be aware that the inside of the reservoir will become contaminated by an orange coating and need to be cleaned.

Hope this will help someone here in the future. Do it BEFORE you need a new heater core.
nord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2016, 07:41   #2
Skimax
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: White mts, NH
Default

If there is orange coating inside the reservoir it's inside the whole cooling system one could conclude. So wouldn't this method of flushing be improved by using a quality cooling system flush followed but flushing with distilled water? Just wondering.
thanks.
__________________
Max
Skimax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2016, 09:23   #3
nord
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southern Tier NY
Default

I don't see why not.
nord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2016, 23:09   #4
jrm
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Oregon
Fuel Economy: 42/52
Default

never thought of that, so your just putting the vacuum where the pressure cap screws in? Where is it getting air from? the tiny return line?
__________________
2013 Passat TDI SE+NAV 48MPG
2001 Honda civic 40MPG
1985 VW idi 1.6 Golf 55MPG http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yo-YUR1_DaU
1996 Dodge mechanical Cummins 12V 2500 4x4 that gets 20MPG
1990 Toyota xcab 4x4 3.0 v6 (3.slow) 15MPG
jrm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 06:20   #5
nord
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southern Tier NY
Default

Actually you'll alternately plug and unplug the return rubber hose. (Finger works just fine.) Vacuum (as stated) is placed directly where the fill cap would normally reside. The open end on the radiator fitting flows enough air and you'll observe the turbidity within the reservoir change as you plug and unplug the hose. The inside of the reservoir under vacuum will remind you of some of those cyclonic vacuum cleaner ads. It's a pretty good show. You'll swear that someone put detergent in the system with all the suds and bubbles.

Whether you use a chemical cleaner or plain distilled water you can expect the reservoir to be fouled with contaminates when you finish. Carefully wash and clean it before you get to the point of adding new coolant.

As to whether to use a chemical cleaner, I chose not to. This based on not wishing to introduce a foreign substance into the system and the possible results. The second water flush yielded nothing but clean hot water... Very clean and very hot. Perhaps a chemical clean would have done better or perhaps not. In any case make sure you have a clean water flush before you fill with new coolant.

The beauty as I see it is that the fouled coolant can be removed while the engine is at operating temp without fear of burning oneself. The thermostat will be open and any fouling in suspension will not have a chance to settle out. The same can be said for the flushes. You'll be surprised at the amount of the orange fouling being pulled back and this is why I mentioned that a good reservoir cleaning will be in order.

Burping the system will be pretty much a non issue on the final fill. Expect to have to add very little coolant after your first run up to operating temp. Based on 400 miles immediately after the flush it appears that my results have been excellent. Nice pink fluid in the reservoir and the coolant level has remained in the safe zone.

As I mentioned previously, assuming this procedure works as it seems to have , then coolant recovery is almost 100%. There will be no HOAT baths or showers, no waiting time between flushes, and generally a painless and clean experience. Sort of like a topside oil change with no worries about hoses or clamps and no leaks or spilled fluids.

Last edited by nord; March 27th, 2016 at 10:00.
nord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 09:28   #6
jrm
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Oregon
Fuel Economy: 42/52
Default

I did a running coolant swap, added coolant while having the return line routed into a bucket. I put in 2 gallons that way. Next swap I will try this method for sure
__________________
2013 Passat TDI SE+NAV 48MPG
2001 Honda civic 40MPG
1985 VW idi 1.6 Golf 55MPG http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yo-YUR1_DaU
1996 Dodge mechanical Cummins 12V 2500 4x4 that gets 20MPG
1990 Toyota xcab 4x4 3.0 v6 (3.slow) 15MPG
jrm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 09:46   #7
Rico567
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Central IL
Default

Since I've got a 2013 Passat and also own a shop-vac, I think I'll try this. So did you just use the VW G12+ (++, +++, etc.) coolant, or buy a different brand?
__________________


"I reject your reality and substitute my own."
- Adam Savage
Rico567 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 10:01   #8
nord
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southern Tier NY
Default

All VW except the distilled water. That was from WallyWorld.
nord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 10:10   #9
jrm
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Oregon
Fuel Economy: 42/52
Default

use G13
__________________
2013 Passat TDI SE+NAV 48MPG
2001 Honda civic 40MPG
1985 VW idi 1.6 Golf 55MPG http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yo-YUR1_DaU
1996 Dodge mechanical Cummins 12V 2500 4x4 that gets 20MPG
1990 Toyota xcab 4x4 3.0 v6 (3.slow) 15MPG
jrm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 10:24   #10
meerschm
Veteran Member
 
meerschm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fairfax county VA
Fuel Economy: twice what my Sprinter gets
Default

What is the capacity of the cooling system? for my 09 jetta, it runs just over 2 gallons, so that a bit over a gallon of G whatever is needed to be added to H20 to get a 50% mix.

just wondering how you figured a quart of full strength coolant is the correct amount.
__________________
Mike

Free advice: it is worth what you pay for it. (sometimes)

Last edited by meerschm; March 27th, 2016 at 10:30.
meerschm is online now   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 10:48   #11
nord
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southern Tier NY
Default

Some days a good guess is about as close as one could come. The mix isn't exactly rocket science as a percent one way or the other will make no appreciable difference.

Consider... Under the best of conditions we can only guess at the amount of liquid remaining in the system after any type of flush. Therefor we assume the quantity. Knowing that pure coolant is heavier than water it makes sense to introduce a quantity into the system as the first step in the refill. Be it a pint or a quart it is what it is.

The beauty here is that an incorrect guess isn't a problem. Too heavy on the coolant and you vacuum a bit out and add water. Too light and you do the opposite. Either way waste will be minimal. No nasty cleanup and it's so easy.
nord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2016, 11:30   #12
jrm
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Oregon
Fuel Economy: 42/52
Default

when I mix my coolant I always mix it 55/45 just in case of those artic conditions- its rare for here but we did see -27F at my friends house in Redmond OR winter before last
__________________
2013 Passat TDI SE+NAV 48MPG
2001 Honda civic 40MPG
1985 VW idi 1.6 Golf 55MPG http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yo-YUR1_DaU
1996 Dodge mechanical Cummins 12V 2500 4x4 that gets 20MPG
1990 Toyota xcab 4x4 3.0 v6 (3.slow) 15MPG
jrm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 28th, 2016, 05:10   #13
r11
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: NJ
Default

Excellent stuff. Now we don't have any excuses not to do it

Those that don't have a shop vac due to lack of space etc - get one, use it for this procedure and place it by the curb to be adopted. $$$$avings and job dunnrite !!!
r11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2016, 11:54   #14
car0430a
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Wisconsin
Default

Any suggestions on if this will work on a 15' with the ea288 motor.
I just remembered I had some coolant test strips in my garage and decided to test my coolant. Well the results do not look good as per the side of the bottle when you compare the colors it states to service the coolant. I tried taking a picture of the coolant in a jar outside it looks orange inside the garage it looks pink.
__________________
-2015 Passat TDI SE 6 speed manual
-Built 12/14-Purchased 5/28, 2015 with 35 miles
Currently @ 47k
-2005 Jeep Liberty CRD, with 185k

Last edited by car0430a; March 29th, 2016 at 12:05.
car0430a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2016, 12:07   #15
meerschm
Veteran Member
 
meerschm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fairfax county VA
Fuel Economy: twice what my Sprinter gets
Default

Only tricky part is that the 2015 EA288 has a couple coolant loops. so that it will take some VCDS manipulation to operate the coolant pumps.

probably start a religious war over this use, similar to the fuel filter question.

but the concept of pulling coolant from the bottle with a shopvac vs drain will probably work.

just keep in mind it will require several cycles.

You sure the coolant strips are good for VW coolant?
__________________
Mike

Free advice: it is worth what you pay for it. (sometimes)
meerschm is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is there an easy way to do a coolant flush and should I do it? Ealerguy VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD) 26 October 12th, 2013 16:06
Coolant Flush joshuare VW MKIII-A3/B4 TDIs 3 August 20th, 2010 09:27
How to flush coolant? ocelot VW MKIII-A3/B4 TDIs 2 April 6th, 2009 14:48
Coolant Flush Blackknight VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD) 5 December 5th, 2004 11:24
coolant flush?? Roy Basch VW MKIV-A4 TDIs (VE and PD) 10 April 6th, 2001 21:27


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:58.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright - TDIClub Online LTD - 2017
Contact Us | Privacy Statement | Forum Rules | Disclaimer
TDIClub Online Ltd (TDIClub.com) is not affiliated with the VWoA or VWAG and is supported by contributions from viewers like you.
1996 - 2017, All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.17309 seconds with 11 queries
[Output: 128.57 Kb. compressed to 107.40 Kb. by saving 21.17 Kb. (16.47%)]