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Go Back   TDIClub Forums > TDI Model Specific Discussions Areas > VW Passat Family (NMS and B7) TDIs (2012+)

VW Passat Family (NMS and B7) TDIs (2012+) Discussion area for the 2012+ Passat TDI (North American and rest of world versions versions). The North American model was previously codenamed NMS (New Midsize Sedan) and the version the rest of the world gets is sometimes referred to as B7.

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Old April 16th, 2015, 16:40   #1
docmanny
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TDI(s): 2012 Passat
Fuel Economy: 42
Lightbulb How to: Replacing the Adblue Heater & Temp Sensor Module

I was getting the 202B fault with my Check Engine Light starting at 74k miles. I have a 2012 TDI SEL. Dealer quote was about $1200 to repair, so I figured I'd do it myself.
The part number is 561-198-970. You can get it online for the mid $400 range. I wasn't absolutely confident about my ability to do the job, so I paid a few bucks more for a return policy without a restocking fee. Here's what you get.

You will also need a torx driver and a socket wrench. You also need a hex bit. A siphon is helpful.
First step is to remove the bumper.
In each wheel well, there are 5 screws to remove. I used a torx bit with a 1/4 inch socket wrench to get in the narrow spots. It would be easier if you remove the wheels, but I didn't feel like jacking up the car. This picture was taken after removing the screws and prying the bumper away.

The top-most screw is at a tight angle
Then remove the tail-lights. Unsnap the electrical connector and unscrew the large white plastic screw. The whole assembly comes out easily.

Remove the two torx screws.

Next remove the torx screws from under the back of the bumper.
Then pry the cover off starting from each wheel well. It takes a little elbow grease, but all that's left holding the cover on are plastic clips.
Here's the Adblue tank with the cover off

There are 3 bolts holding the tank on. Two are located at the rear of the tank, and one in the front. Remove those and the tank comes right down.

Remove the foam piece and start disconnecting wires. You'll have to cut some cable ties to disconnect the mess. Don't worry, you can't reconnect the wires incorrectly later. Each clip is shaped differently. The kit comes with new wire clips also.
Now would be a good time to siphon out some of the Adblue fluid. You can use a fish tank vaccum for that (I wouldn't use it in a fish tank again though)

Now remove the three bolts holding the control module on.

Pull upwards. There is an O ring holding the module onto the tank, so you'll get some resistance.

Note the position of the arrow and the two hash marks on the tank. This will be important when putting everything back together.
Unscrew the large ring holding the heater down. Its very tight. I used a hammer and pry bar to loosen the ring. You get a new ring in the kit, so no worries.
Now pry off the top of the heater element. I used a flat head screwdriver. Remove the large O ring.

You have to rotate this piece a few degrees before it comes out.
Now that you have it off, its just the reverse to put it back together again. Beware of the arrow when you reseat the top of the heater. I made the expensive mistake of putting it the wrong place and broke the nipple off the control module ($500 retail, you can find it for $375). It also helps to have an empty Adblue tank, since it makes it lighter to reinstall on the frame.
Whole project should take less than an hour if you know what you're doing.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 16:48   #2
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Cool write up! Thanks for sharing.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 10:44   #3
VeeDubTDI
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Thank you very much! This looks pretty straight forward and is definitely a driveway job for people with reasonable mechanical aptitude. This is on our to-do list in the coming weeks, as we've been getting an intermittent CEL for the DEF temp sensor.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 10:48   #4
docmanny
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You're welcome. Just be careful with how you seat the top back in. I have to take the bumper and tank down again next week so I can replace the control module. I tried to superglue the nozzle back on, but no luck. No I get a CEL for low fluid pressure and DEF stains in the driveway. No problems with driving the car though.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 14:04   #5
jimbo1mcm
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Wonderful write up. Thanks.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 19:06   #6
jrm
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Great write up, Should be a sticky- I will keep my feelings mute on having to do that much work and spend $400 with less than 80K on the car
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Old April 17th, 2015, 19:47   #7
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How can that not be an emissions item and be under warranty?
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Old April 17th, 2015, 20:27   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryT82 View Post
How can that not be an emissions item and be under warranty?
VW only provides the bare minimum warranty as required by the EPA, 2yr 24k. I guess they made the right choice for their bottom line. Other manufacturers offer coverage beyond the minimum, ex Ford SCR is 5yrs 50k.
http://www.epa.gov/obd/pubs/420f09048.pdf
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Old April 18th, 2015, 04:35   #9
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Did you need to remove the bumper? I have a lift and it looks like I could drop the tank right out - maybe loosen the screws and clips for the bumper on the pass side.
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Old April 18th, 2015, 06:30   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrm View Post
Great write up, Should be a sticky- I will keep my feelings mute on having to do that much work and spend $400 with less than 80K on the car
It's linked in the Maintenance/How To sticky.
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Old April 22nd, 2015, 08:14   #11
spjackson1
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Thanks for the great write up and details. I probably will be following your post to replace the heater sensor. I'm wondering what kind of ADBlue you used prior to replacement and if you used the same brand after. At 40k, I added Peak ADBlue and now have the code at 44k. Just wondering if there is a correlation with the brand of ADBlue and this fault.
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Old April 22nd, 2015, 08:47   #12
showdown 42
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The ad blue to use is VW even though you wouildn't think you would need too.

The second thing about this issue is this system is a poor engineering problem that fails on a regular basis. I have had it happen in my TREG 2012. Dealers have this part in stock for a reason. I would go to VWOA and make a complaint just to add your voice to the many that have already been made. My problem was handled as a courtesy even though out of time of warranty, which I appreciated,but it should not have happened at 30K miles
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Old April 22nd, 2015, 08:49   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spjackson1 View Post
At 40k, I added Peak ADBlue and now have the code at 44k. Just wondering if there is a correlation with the brand of ADBlue and this fault.
I've used Peak multiple times. It meets specs.
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Old April 22nd, 2015, 09:16   #14
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I think the problem is an electronic issue (bad solder joint, failed resistor/cap/whatever, etc), not a fluid issue.
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Old April 26th, 2015, 21:48   #15
VWrussell
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Hello,
I recently had the Check Engine Light come on with the P205c/P205b fault codes. I did some extensive research because I did not want to spend $475 on a new part to fix this as my Passat just went out of warranty.
The failed temperature sensor is integrated inside the AD Blue Tank and you cannot change this sensor out at the component level. The part number that contains this sensor is 561-198-970.

This temp sensor monitors the temperature of the DEF fluid and if it drops below -11 Degrees Fahrenheit then it activates the heater inside this tank. Since I live in Texas I don't really have to worry about -11 degree temperatures here. There are two ways to fix this issue yourself if you do or do not live in a climate where the weather gets below -11.

before you start, purchase a 10k Ohm Resistor or Automotive grade 10k Ohm Submersible Thermistor, Solder, heatshrink.
Mouser Electronics or eBay are two places to find these components.

Once you have all your parts ready, Here are the steps to take:

Use the jack in your trunk to lift up the rear passenger side until the tire just barely comes off the ground.
Remove all the torx screws that are around the rear fender well.
There should be 5 of them if I'm not mistaken.
Pull out the plastic part of your lower bumper/quarter panel.
Just enough to give you a few extra inches for removing the tank.
The tank is held in place by 3 bolts, remove them and drop the tank down. (Be ready to catch it if it's full of DEF as it will be heavy)
Find the Wire harness that is secured to the filler neck of the tank.
Pins 3 & 4 are the temp sensor wires connected to the failed temp sensor inside the tank. They are purple/yellow and Brown and on the other side of the connector the wire colors are Black & White going into the tank.

Easy Fix option if you're lazy or live in a warm weather climate:

From the other side of the plug, cut the wires that are going into the tank (Black & White wires). Make sure to leave enough slack for the resistor or thermistor.
Solder & heatshrink a 10K ohm resistor or 10k OHM Thermistor to the cut wires still connected to the plug. Make sure that the connections are made back to the computer and not to the tank. Leave the wires from the tank cut off and just use some tape or heat shrink to protect them as they will never be used again.

For Cold Climate Areas:

Take a picture of the tank before you start, ensure you know the position of all the cables, hoses and top pump position.
Remove all the harness, Hoses and Pump from the Top of the tank.
Unscrew the Top of the tank and remove the rubber grommet and plastic circular housing from the tank. The circular housing is locked in, just twist it counter clock wise and it will become detached from the tank.
Find/trace the wires inside the tank that are associated with pins 3 & 4 on the outside of the tank.
Using a Submersible Automotive Grade 10k Ohm thermistor,
Solder/Heatshrink the thermistor to these wires and make sure the probe part of the thermistor is located in the small part of the tank with the other sensors. Some Drilling may be necessary.

As I live in Texas, I did not pursue or try the Cold Climate option I described above.
Also, as I was troubleshooting this issue, I actually drilled a small hole in the plastic and extended the wires so I could access them from my trunk when I was trying to figure out the correct resistor to use.

At the time I was not sure what resistor size to use. After trying different values. I borrowed a friends 2014 TDI and used my meter to find the value VW uses for this component.
The 10k Ohm Resistance reading is equal to 25 degrees Celsius or 77 degrees Fahrenheit. This resistance reading will make the computer think the DEF fluid is at this temperature.

In the pictures attached I show the connections to look for.
(See Links below)

If you don't want to drop the tank, another option is to cut the wires from the connector by the rear wheel and add the resistor or thermistor from there. It also uses pins 3 & 4 on one of the wire harnesses.


Once I added the 10K Ohm resistor, it took me about 4 days of everyday driving before my Check Engine Light went out. I'm not sure of the exact number but the computer needs to go through a certain number of "driving cycles" before it realizes the problem is fixed and the light goes off.


One more thing to note if your adblue tank is full, unplug the harness/hose and dump all the DEF fluid into a large clean container.
This will help out as its very hard to get the tank bolted back into position. Once the nearly empty tank is bolted back in place, just re-fill it as you normally would. I use the small Filler bottle from VW. I have a hole cut out in the bottom of it and use a funnel to re-fill that small bottle. Once its full I push the bottle down to let the DEF enter the tank. Repeat until your full....


I hope this post helps.
No sense in spending close to $500 when you can replace this with a resistor or thermistor that costs less than a dollar. (And an hour or two of your time)


~Russ

Pictures to help you:

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j2...h/IMG_2307.jpg

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j2...h/IMG_2305.jpg

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j2...h/IMG_2303.jpg

Last edited by VWrussell; April 26th, 2015 at 22:30. Reason: Updated wire colors
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