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VW MKV-A5 Golf/Jettas Discussions area for A5/MkV Jetta/Golf (2005/2006 PD and 2009 CR).

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Old May 14th, 2017, 20:15   #1
Zwelder81
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Default 2006 brm camshaft tools?

I am replacing the camshaft in my jetta. I am just wondering what specialty tools I will need? Any info would be greatly appreciated.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 05:03   #2
Rembrant
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Originally Posted by Zwelder81 View Post
I am replacing the camshaft in my jetta. I am just wondering what specialty tools I will need? Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Check the Metalnerd website for everything you need:

http://www.metalnerd.com/cat20.htm

I just did this job a few weeks ago. Since I already had some of the ALH tools, for the BRM I had to buy the crank lock, and tools for removing the cam sprocket....oh, and I bought the pin for the serpentine tensioner.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 05:03   #3
Henrick
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Usually camshaft and crankshaft lock tools, cam hub pulling tool, torque wrench.

However, skillful person can do a cam job without any special tools.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 05:11   #4
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However, skillful person can do a cam job without any special tools.
A skillful person that also has lots of free time and interest in fabricating tools.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 06:42   #5
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A skillful person that also has lots of free time and interest in fabricating tools.
Or mark and pray hacks that get lucky.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 15:43   #6
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Or mark and pray hacks that get lucky.
My 06 BRM Jetta is the 3rd TDI I've purchased (out of 4) that had a previous "mark and pray" TB job. The BRM also had a plastic impeller Altrom pump and a Napa timing belt. Probably not terrible if installed properly, but still...I think the mark and pray jobs are a lot more common than we think.

The Metalnerd tools sure are nicely made. They make the job go quite smoothly imho.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 16:47   #7
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No, you don't need a cam hub pulling tool. What you do is loosen the cam's big bolt several turns and then smack the back side of the hub with a brass drift.

When I replaced my cam, the only special tools I needed were the crank indexing tool and a letter "A" sized drill bit for the cam. You will have to get creative on monkey rigging a holding tool to loosen and tighten/torque the cam big bolt.

Unless you do 2 or 3 cams/TB's a day, the Metalnerd deluxe timing tool kit is kinda overkill.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 17:44   #8
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Originally Posted by Ol'Rattler View Post
No, you don't need a cam hub pulling tool. What you do is loosen the cam's big bolt several turns and then smack the back side of the hub with a brass drift.

When I replaced my cam, the only special tools I needed were the crank indexing tool and a letter "A" sized drill bit for the cam. You will have to get creative on monkey rigging a holding tool to loosen and tighten/torque the cam big bolt.

Unless you do 2 or 3 cams/TB's a day, the Metalnerd deluxe timing tool kit is kinda overkill.
Have to agree with Ol'Rattler. Currently doing a cam job. Cam is out and waiting for new cam to arrive and those are all the tool I have used. Hub comes off easy with a few smacks tool not needed and I did the "pro system" for removing the Cam without removing the fuel pump. At 200K wear on the cam; but very little on the lifters. Still along way to go but going very well.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 19:28   #9
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You are one of the lucky ones to get 200K out of the cam and lifters!

The specialty tools I used were from Metalnerd:
Hub wrench (T10051)
Puller (T10052)
Crank Lock
Pump and Cam sprocket Pin.

The puller was probably not necessary, since it basically slipped off with very little pressure. The crank lock was a must for me.

I was glad to have all the help I could get though, since this was my first cam project on an interference type engine.
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Old May 15th, 2017, 22:14   #10
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Never said this should be a mark and pray job.
Instead of the cam lock pin some torx key can be used which is exactly 6 mm. 6 mm drill bit is 5.98 I think, while the tool was exactly 6.00.
Removing cam hub requires your imagination.
Removing cam itself requires crank to be turned backwards so that all the pistons are midway.
Crankshaft position can be found using TDC (or "0") mark on the flywheel through the inspection hole in transmission case. After it is located, flat head screwdrivers (or similar flat metal items) can be inserted between the teeth and supported to trans case so it won't move.

After you finish your job, Torsion value should be checked and adjusted if needed.

You might be surprised, but proper lock down tools are not that preceise as you think. They still allow pretty much movement on both shafts.
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Old May 16th, 2017, 07:45   #11
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Does the OP's BRM have an inspection hole for TDC, I wonder? My 2006 Jetta's BEW does not, which was *my* excuse to add another Metalnerd tool to the stable.
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Old May 16th, 2017, 09:48   #12
N.CaTDI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rig View Post
You are one of the lucky ones to get 200K out of the cam and lifters!
Have used Mobil-1 TDT oil since it went out of warranty at 50K (before was VW 10-30). Already had some wear then. I inspected the cam lobes every 40K and given the chamfer was gone on the top of 3 lobes felt it was time with this timing belt change. Most surprised that the lifters have little or no dishing.

Henrick note about turning crank back: This is how I did it. Had engine in TDC; Took off timing belt; Turned Crank back 90 Degrees (cam does not move); Then turn Cam back 90 degrees (crank does not move) (this would be like turning Crank back 180 degrees) so that it would come out of fuel pump. Once new cam installed I will set lash for injectors (Franks Method) then move cam to TDC; Then move crank to TDC and finish by installing new timing belt.
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Old May 16th, 2017, 23:15   #13
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Does the OP's BRM have an inspection hole for TDC, I wonder? My 2006 Jetta's BEW does not, which was *my* excuse to add another Metalnerd tool to the stable.
The hole should be on the top of the transmission, not the engine.
I guess then it depends on the gearbox if your doesn't.
Most Euro-spec VWs (5 and 6 speeds) I have seen did have that hole. And obviously about 90% of them had missing hole plug which is a real pain to find even at the dealership
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Old May 18th, 2017, 18:55   #14
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Finished my Cam replacement up the other day. Everything went very well. Lash adjustment was easy and the hardest part was getting the stud in for the timing belt tension-er in that I was using the Dieselgeek method so did not remove the engine support. Tools I used are the Crank lock and Cam lock pin.
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