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General Automotive General automotive discussion. This is intended to be a discussion about other not VW and Diesel cars you may have or interested in.

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Old January 12th, 2019, 17:21   #1276
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Arrow a bill to raise the North Dakota maximum to 80 mph

....a bill to raise the North Dakota maximum to 80 mph is up for consideration again in the legislature again....

Quote:
Speed Limit Bill Proposes Increase to 80 MPH



Some lawmakers are backing a bill to up our interstate speed limits to 80 miles per hour. Our Malique Rankin explains what this bill could mean for drivers. House Bill 1264 is proposing to change the speed limit of multilane highways from 70 to 75. For interstates, increasing from 75 to 80.

The bill has highway patrol officers concerned.

Wade Kadrmas; HP Safety Edu Officer: "Statistics will show that speed is one of the leading causes of serious injury crashes."

Representative Jake Blum took a look at a different set of stats.

Rep. Jake Blum; (R) Grand Forks: "I've looked at other states: Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota right here. Texas even has portions of its interstate at 85 MPH. And the imperial data supports that there hasn't been an increase in fatality or unsafe conditions."

What could a speed limit increase mean for your car in the long run? KX News spoke to a mechanic to find out.

Stephen Stockert is a mechanic and says the limit increase won't do much harm to your car.

Stephen Stockert ; Asst Manager at Capitol Heights Auto Clinic: "Nothing more than what there currently is with the speed limit at 75."

But it could have you burning more gas.

Stephen Stockert ; Asst Manager at Capitol Heights Auto Clinic: "Obviously the faster you go, the more gas it's going to take to get there."

Blum says this bill would get drivers to their destination faster.

Rep. Jake Blum; (R) Grand Forks: "So to me, this is all about efficiency. We're a pretty big state, wide open spaces, long distances between them. I view our state as a corridor of commerce."

Depending on your commute, Highway Patrol says speed may not make a difference.

Wade Kadrmas; HP Safety Edu Officer: "That five miles an hour is only going to shave off maybe a second or two from point a to point b, so there's a really no time benefit."

The bill is expected to be back in committee in the next few weeks. Last session, a similar bill to increase the state's speed limit failed.
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Old January 13th, 2019, 09:35   #1277
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Didn't read the whole thread...sorry, not sorry.

Just going off the title and the vibe of the thread, which seems to be concerned with increasing speed limits. Positively concerned, as in eager to see them rise.

I'm a bit caught... As someone who received the absolute highest possible speeding ticket (among ~10 other speeding tickets) before being arrested and put in jail (99 in a 70 in Virginia, at 30 over, vehicle impound and jail time is mandatory), I clearly have little respect for speed limit signs.

On the other hand, I don't see a reason for anything to be above 70. I'd be very happy to see little-to-no enforcement of the speed limit, but see no reason for over 70.
I drive 500miles/week from Morgantown WV to Wash DC. ~160 miles of that is on a 2 lane freeway through the woods with 70mph SL. I usually maintain ~80. Even at that speed, I feel guilty of drastically reduced MPG, and other needless wear&tear or inefficiencies. Additionally, if your car is not decently-to-very-well maintained, it's not a good experience.
I've owned ~30 cars, and driven even more. Even a slightly loose tie rod, or one wheel losing a single balance weight can really 'shake things up,' literally.

There's always that lifted bro truck riding your *** for 20 miles, then flooring it, disappearing into the horizon at 100 mph, but I don't think most people are interested in this.

In DC, the speed limits are exceedingly frustrating. 55mph on the beltway. Everyone does ~72. Sometimes I'll be in court, and hear someone fighting a speeding ticket of ~75mph on the beltway. And it's just this utter BS because literally everyone in the room (including judge and Police offer) are blatantly aware of the flow of traffic.
Maybe raise that one to 65 or 70 but anything more is a bit excessive.
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Old January 13th, 2019, 10:18   #1278
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Originally Posted by 2000alhVW View Post
Didn't read the whole thread...sorry, not sorry.

Just going off the title and the vibe of the thread, which seems to be concerned with increasing speed limits. Positively concerned, as in eager to see them rise.

I'm a bit caught... As someone who received the absolute highest possible speeding ticket (among ~10 other speeding tickets) before being arrested and put in jail (99 in a 70 in Virginia, at 30 over, vehicle impound and jail time is mandatory), I clearly have little respect for speed limit signs.

On the other hand, I don't see a reason for anything to be above 70. I'd be very happy to see little-to-no enforcement of the speed limit, but see no reason for over 70.
I drive 500miles/week from Morgantown WV to Wash DC. ~160 miles of that is on a 2 lane freeway through the woods with 70mph SL. I usually maintain ~80. Even at that speed, I feel guilty of drastically reduced MPG, and other needless wear&tear or inefficiencies. Additionally, if your car is not decently-to-very-well maintained, it's not a good experience.
I've owned ~30 cars, and driven even more. Even a slightly loose tie rod, or one wheel losing a single balance weight can really 'shake things up,' literally.

There's always that lifted bro truck riding your *** for 20 miles, then flooring it, disappearing into the horizon at 100 mph, but I don't think most people are interested in this.

In DC, the speed limits are exceedingly frustrating. 55mph on the beltway. Everyone does ~72. Sometimes I'll be in court, and hear someone fighting a speeding ticket of ~75mph on the beltway. And it's just this utter BS because literally everyone in the room (including judge and Police offer) are blatantly aware of the flow of traffic.
Maybe raise that one to 65 or 70 but anything more is a bit excessive.

Things are far different from the East coast. There the states are small with most less than 10,000 sq mi in area. Maryland is 9,775 sq mi and is roughly 120 miles by 240 miles so it can be crossed within 2.5 hours at your preferred speed of 70.

However the states get larger as you move west and the plains states are flat and extremely rural. Thus to cross North Dakota from east to west would take 5 hours at 70 but only 4 hours at 80. So higher speed limits make more sense out west with Texas being a good candidate for 85 on the western parts of I-20 & I-10.
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Old January 13th, 2019, 10:52   #1279
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I fail to see how the size of a state (lines drawn on a map) has any influence on your vehicle speed. Other than an anxiety/psychological thing

I do understand how decreased likelihood of an accident (less populated —> less drivers on the road, very flat straight roads, etc) May have some effect, but “cruising” at 90mph wherever you are is just simply excessive
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Old January 13th, 2019, 15:44   #1280
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I fail to see how the size of a state (lines drawn on a map) has any influence on your vehicle speed. Other than an anxiety/psychological thing
Do. The. Math.

A trip of 8 hours @ 70 miles per hour = 8*70 = 560 miles

The same 8 hour trip @ 80 mph = 8*80 = 640 miles

To cover 640 miles @ 70 mph would require at least 1 more hour of driving, or more than 9 hours.

I figured by comparing the distance to cross a tiny state like Maryland to cross a huge Western state like North Dakota (WHICH is the TOPIC of the post you didn't bother to read) it would be evident that higher limits are needed in the west. However, your very first sentence above tells me you didn't comprehend what I was trying to show. Thus I have tried to make it clearer.

I agree that in Maryland and other tiny states back East, a speed limit of no more than 60/65 might be sufficient. However the larger states back there such as NY, PA, VA, etc., might be better off at 70/75.
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Old January 15th, 2019, 10:35   #1281
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Do. The. Math.

A trip of 8 hours @ 70 miles per hour = 8*70 = 560 miles

The same 8 hour trip @ 80 mph = 8*80 = 640 miles

To cover 640 miles @ 70 mph would require at least 1 more hour of driving, or more than 9 hours.

I figured by comparing the distance to cross a tiny state like Maryland to cross a huge Western state like North Dakota (WHICH is the TOPIC of the post you didn't bother to read) it would be evident that higher limits are needed in the west. However, your very first sentence above tells me you didn't comprehend what I was trying to show. Thus I have tried to make it clearer.

I agree that in Maryland and other tiny states back East, a speed limit of no more than 60/65 might be sufficient. However the larger states back there such as NY, PA, VA, etc., might be better off at 70/75.
you completely missed the point, but okay.
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Old January 17th, 2019, 21:00   #1282
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Many of the western States showed during the 55 era , the DOT's documented lower limits made travel less safe from the extra hours these uncomfortable to travel at political maximums created what came to be known as the deadly hours. Deadly hours are done away with by allowing vehicles, when we are allowed to legally travel @ safe design minimums of 85mph. Most miles outside of urban areas are safely traveled everyday @ 80-90mph. Allowing vehicles to travel @ safe design min max speeds can cut hours off the drive between western cities.

I have to say that unless you are forced to cross these big empties in the west, assigning an arbitrary max to places you are not required to cross while just getting around these areas, like a 70 max on roads that safely traveled @ 85-90mph today all day long misses the real point here.....

The point of all of my posts is that for poated limits to actually have a positive impact on safety they must be related to what drivers & the engineers say is the speed that should be allowed, safely allowed by posting 85th percentile maximums....
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Old January 17th, 2019, 21:32   #1283
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As an example, San Bernardino County here in California at 20,100 sq. mi. is 62% LARGER than Maryland at 12,400 sq. mi. and that includes Maryland's part of the Chesapeake Bay. If we just use Maryland's land area only (9,774 sq. mi.) then San Bernardino County is TWICE the size of Maryland.
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Old January 30th, 2019, 15:44   #1284
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Currently 9 states are currently considering raising maximums....


Oklahoma & ND once again pushing forward with legislation to have 80 mph posted on rural freeways....

California & Indiana are looking into passing law to do away split lower allowed maximums on heavy trucks...55 to 65 allowed in CA, with Indiana looking to bring heavy truck limits from 65 today up to 70 which would be the same as all other traffic
...

Missouri & Iowa are once again trying raise their allowed maximums for all traffic from 70 today to 75 which is closer to averages obsevered across the states today....


Nevada is finally at the end of their multi year study efforts to see where higher limits up to 80mph posted are safe. The end of last week NVDOT anouced more 80mph posted zones are coming soon across the state....details to be released on which specific stretches of highways & freeways will see posted maximums rise as high as 80mph. It has been hinted that some of the state's current 70 posted zones on other types of roads & highways could also see maximums rise as high as 80mph posted under the soon to be released study suggestions....

Minnesota is currently in the process of raising maximums across the state on all 5000 miles of the state's rural highways system...this process of raising limits to 60mph began in limited fashion ~4 years ago. During that time all the data collected shown the 5 mph increase was safe to implement the increase state wide over the state's 5000+ miles of highways system....
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Old January 30th, 2019, 15:53   #1285
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Oregon is looking at changes in laws to allow more local of setting maximums without the current requirements that say a speed study must be done before changes in posted is allowed....all of the DOT data collected from around the world says this is a bad idea which to speed traps put in place for revenue collection which make travel less safe....
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Old January 30th, 2019, 17:02   #1286
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Arrow 7 States Follow Michigan’s Example, Working to Raise Speed Limits

here is a specific story that has more specific info on possible limit changes in some of the states.....


Quote:
7 States Follow Michigan’s Example, Working to Raise Speed Limits
By Steve Sweitzer - January 29, 20192166

Do you love to travel? Many people do, I love it. Traveling for work I have seen many great parts of this country. Generally, I drive, sometimes long distances. The wife tags along to help behind the wheel. We both enjoy seeing new scenery.

Still, traveling is ultimately about getting there. With the safety advancements in today’s cars, high-speed travel across highways is possibly as safe as it’s ever been. More on that later.

Highway Speed Increases in Michigan


Photo Credit: CBS Detroit
In 2017 Michigan’s Department of Transportation increased speeds on a number of the state’s highways. You might not have noticed some of them. The closest being I-69 from Swartz Creek to East Lansing going from 70 mph to 75 mph.


Michigan Department of Transportation
Seven More States Raising Speeds or Considering Such in 2019

California: Source = leginfo.legislature.ca.gov

A bill (Assembly Bill #172) introduced by Assembly Member Randy Voepel would make changes to truck speeds. Existing law prohibits a person from driving certain vehicles, such as a motor truck or truck tractor having 3 or more axles or a motor truck or truck tractor drawing any other vehicle, upon a highway at a speed in excess of 55 miles per hour.



This bill would authorize a person to drive a motor truck or truck tractor having 3 or more axles, or a motor truck or truck tractor drawing any other vehicle, in rural areas at a speed of up to 65 miles per hour.
Indiana: Source = The Chicago Tribune

“Rep. Michael Aylesworth, R-Hebron, has introduced a bill that would enact uniform speed limits for cars and trucks on rural interstates authorizing trucks to travel 70 mph.”

Iowa: Source = www.legis.iowa.gov

State Senate Bill No. 26 would raise the speed limit on Iowa Interstate Highways from 70 to 75 mph.

Minnesota: Source = Department of Transportation

The Minnesota Department of Transportation is increasing speeds on 5,240 miles of state highways based on the recommendations of a five-year study released this week. The speeds will increase from 55 to 60 miles per hour.

Of the 7,000 miles studied, speed limits ultimately will be increased on 77 percent of rural, two-lane state highways, according to the final report. New speed limits go into effect once new speed limit signs are posted. Most of the signs posting the new speed limits are in place, with the rest expected to be up by spring 2019.

Missouri: Source = Legiscan.com

A bill introduced into the state legislature proposes raising the maximum speed limit on rural interstates and freeways of the state from 70 to 75 miles per hour.

North Dakota: Source = www.legis.nd.gov

House Bill #1264 proposes raising the speed limit from 70 to 75 mph on divided highways. Also to raise the speed limit from 75 to 80 mph on restricted access highways.

Oklahoma: = Legiscan.com

Oklahoma Lawmakers are considering raising the speed limit on Oklahoma’s Turnpike from 75 to 80 mph.
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Old February 18th, 2019, 12:48   #1287
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Arrow

as of last week, because of a tie vote in the North Dakota legislature, it looks like the effort to raise the maximum to 80 mph may be dead for the year,....
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Old February 24th, 2019, 22:10   #1288
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Question Is the American Autobahn next? How states are pushing highway speeds past the limit..

Could California be the first state to put unregulated with no numerical speed lanes back in the US.....?.....


Quote:
Is the American Autobahn next? How states are pushing highway speeds past the limit

Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY Published 6:16 a.m. ET Feb. 22, 2019 | Updated 5:42 p.m. ET Feb. 24, 2019

"We have routinely seen studies that show when states raise speed limits, they can expect higher deaths," said Maureen Vogel, spokeswoman for the National Safety Council.

Seven states — Idaho, Montana, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Wyoming — have allowed 80 mph speed limits on select highways. One, Texas, has 85 mph on a section of State Highway 130. Legislatures have upped limits as cars have become safer and more powerful and the price of gas has tumbled, lowering concerns about the poor fuel mileage that high-speed driving can bring.

Yet the resulting higher speeds haven't made much of a statistical dent in highway deaths, the Governors Highway Safety Association reports.

In 2017, there were 9,717 speed-related deaths from among 37,133 total road fatalities. Those speed-related deaths were down 574 from 2016, were about the same as in 2015 and up 434 from 2014.

In California, Moorlach doesn't think safety will be a showstopper when it comes to his no-speed-limit plan. He said crash concerns haven't dampened enthusiasm for the German Autobahn, a haven for speedsters for decades. In announcing his plan, he pointed to a World Health Organization report that estimates road traffic deaths at 4.1 per 100,000 people in Germany compared with 12.4 in the U.S.

His bill would add four lanes to two highways, Interstate 5 and California State Route 99, for drivers who want the convenience of going without a speed limit.

The lanes would be in place of finishing the first leg of California's high-speed rail line, derided as the "train to nowhere" by critics because the first leg wouldn't connect to either Los Angeles or San Francisco, the whole point of the line as originally envisioned.

Making matters worse, the Trump administration announced last week that it would cancel $929 million in funding needed to complete the first segment of rail.

After California Gov. Gavin Newsom said this month that building the entire bullet train line would be too expensive and take too long, Moorlach said a brainstorming session resulted in the American Autobahn idea. Adding lanes would be expensive, but it is "still a whole lot cheaper than $77 billion," the latest estimated cost of the rail project.

It may be cheaper, but it won't be safer, experts complain.

Higher speeds not only can increase the frequency of crashes, but the severity as well since vehicles smash into each other at higher combined speeds.

More: 'Probably safer': What it was like when states had no speed limits

"You can change speed limits, but you can't change physics," Vogel said.

A study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety found that the lives of 33,000 motorists and their passengers would have been saved if there had been no speed limit increases between 1993, when states posted highways at either 55 mph or 65 mph, and 2013.

Opinion: California bullet train setback shouldn't be end of the line

More: Trump tweets about California's plans for high-speed rail. Gov. Newsom responds: 'Fake news'


Another IIHS study that looked only at the effect of raising the speed limit to 80 mph in Utah estimated that an increase in traffic speed of only 3 mph, to 78 mph, increased the chance of fatalities by 17 percent.

The other problem is that even with higher limits, people tend to drive faster than they should.

Having gone on trips to Utah and Nevada, where other motorists sometimes whiz by at 90 mph, Chuck Farmer, vice president of research for IIHS, said, "Personally, I find it very uncomfortable."

"When higher speed signs go up, not only is traffic moving faster but some motorists immediately start exceeding the new posted limit," said Jonathan Adkins, executive director of the Governors Highway Safety Association. The effect is a "double whammy" on the average speed of traffic.

He calls speeding "the forgotten issue" in traffic safety. It's ignored because so many drivers push the limits.

Quote:
'Probably safer': What it was like when states had no speed limits.....
Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY Published 6:12 a.m. ET Feb. 22, 2019 | Updated 7:41 p.m. ET Feb. 24, 2019

No highway speed limits? For some Nevada and Montana motorists with long memories, that's what made their states special.

As California deals with a proposal to remove speed limits through its Central Valley, there are those elsewhere in the West who remember what it was like to be happy leadfoots who didn't have to worry about speeding tickets.

Nevada and Montana were holdouts when it came to not having speed limits in sparsely populated, wide-open spaces. Some might say that was crazy.

"It was probably safer than it is now just because there weren't as many people," recalls Toni Mendive, 76, an archivist at the Northeastern Nevada Museum in the town of Elko. "There was just more common sense then."

As a result, Mendive said she doesn't recall driving a car any faster than 70 mph – even though she legally could have gone faster.

Some did. Elko newspaper publisher Warren "Snowy" Monroe became the stuff of legend when he raced an airplane about 300 miles from Elko to the capital of Carson City in days before the speed limit – and won.


Speed limits have become as American as federal income taxes. Connecticut was likely the first to enact speed limits at the dawn of the automotive age in 1901. But in the rugged West, both Nevada and Montana clung to their independent ways until Congress, with President Richard Nixon's blessings, clamped down with a national speed limit in 1974 after the gasoline shortages.

It was the dreaded "double nickel" – 55 mph.

While Nevada and Montana lost their policies of limitless highway speed, they did find a way around the federal policy. Both limited tickets to low-cost penalties that didn't penalize drivers' records. The crime wasn't deemed speeding. Rather, it was wasting energy.

A Montana newspaper, The Missoulian, which compiled a history of state's dealings with the speed limit, said the penalty was $5. Some drivers kept a wad of $5 bills in their glove compartments so if they were pulled over, they would be ready to pay the fine on the spot. In Nevada, the penalty was $15.

In 1995, when Congress removed the 55 mph speed limit, Montana took away its speed limit and went without once again, the Missoulian reported. But it was reinstated in 1999 after a state supreme court ruling, but set at a maximum of 75 mph. In both Nevada and Montana, the speed limit can now go as high as 80 mph.

Still, the age without a speed limit in Montana kindles nostalgia. Coming of age in Missoula, Gordon Noel said everyone drove fast. The goal was to just stay on the road. It didn't help that cars of that age, like the 1950 Chevrolet he started driving when he was 16, were far more primitive than those today. They didn't have safety systems, advanced suspensions and better tires.

"On a fast, straight stretch of road I could go 80 mph, but most of the time you didn't dare," said Noel, 77, author of a new memoir of growing up in the Big Sky Country State, "Out of Montana."

Noel, a Harvard graduate who became a physician, said his dad drove even faster.

"My father would say he needed to 'blow the carbon out' of his car. We would see how long it would take to get to 100 mph," said Noel, who now lives in Portland, Oregon. But at least he and dad were always able to stay focused on the road.

"We certainly didn't keep our eye on the speedometer because we were worried about the speed limit," he added.
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Old February 24th, 2019, 22:22   #1289
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Arrow Bill to up speed limits on Oklahoma turnpikes, rural highways clears Senate committee

Oklahoma legislature advances speed limit increase bill last week....




Quote:
Bill to up speed limits on Oklahoma turnpikes, rural highways clears Senate committee


By Barbara Hoberock Tulsa World Feb 19, 2019 Updated Feb 20, 2019

OKLAHOMA CITY — A legislative panel on Tuesday passed a bill that could result in increased speed limits on turnpikes and highways in rural areas.

The Senate Transportation Committee passed Senate Bill 648 by Sen. Joseph Silk, R-Broken Bow.

The measure would increase the maximum speed to 80 mph on turnpikes. Some turnpikes have a 75 mph maximum speed. The state’s two urban turnpikes, the Creek and Kilpatrick, have a maximum speed of 70 mph.

The measure would also increase the maximum speed to 75 mph on rural sections of the interstate highway system.

It allows the Transportation Commission to make such designations.

“Provided, however, the commission shall determine prior to the designation of such segments that public safety will not be jeopardized,” according to the measure.

The measure passed by a vote of 7-1. Sen. Carri Hicks, D-Oklahoma City, voted against it. Hicks said she had some public safety concerns about the measure.

The bill heads to the Senate floor for consideration.

Transportation Secretary-designate Tim Gatz said he has some concerns about raising the speed limit on turnpikes, adding that they are not designed for such speeds.

In addition, increased speeds also put road workers at risk, he said.

Gatz said he plans to visit with Silk about his concerns.
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Old February 24th, 2019, 22:33   #1290
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Arrow OhioDOT wants OK for/power in law to install variable speed limits based on condition

OhioDOT wants OK for/power in law to install variable speed limits based on conditions across the state....


Quote:
OhioDOT wants OK for/power in law to install variable speed limits based on conditions across the state....

February 24, 2019 at 4:30p.m.


Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's Department of Transportation is seeking permission to apply changes in speed limits anytime statewide.

The department currently is allowed to impose variable speed limits based on road conditions on only a few interstate stretches such as when a snow storm hits I-90 east of Cleveland or when traffic is heavy on I-670 in Columbus, the Dayton Daily News reported .

The proposed change would mean electronic speed limit signs on Ohio highways that could be changed depending on conditions.

Department Director Jack Marchbanks is asking state lawmakers for the authority to apply variable speed limits across the state.

"What we're talking about is applying it where we have construction projects and we have also known safety issues such as white-outs or other issues impacting traffic, impacting safety of our traveling motorists," Marchbanks said.

An example would be applying a lower speed limit during a winter storm, and then returning to the original speed limit when weather conditions improve.

Marchbanks said the department is not interested in raising highway speed limits.

"People are driving too fast already," the director said.

State lawmakers approved a test of variable speed limits on I-670 in Columbus starting in 2018.

Current law only allows speed limits to be temporarily lowered in school zones and work zones.
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