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TDI 101 Got a simple/basic TDI question? Are you a newbie (new to the forums). Feel free to post your question here.

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Old January 17th, 2018, 07:44   #16
Nicrocc
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Ok this is awesome. Thanks for all the support! This looks like a very active, and resourceful forum. Ok 1st step is to do a compression test and then pull the head right? And I’m assuming if compression checks out ok I should check the turbo?

Does any have any recommendations on where I could get the best deals on engine parts / rebuild kit or a used engine?
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Old January 17th, 2018, 07:54   #17
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Where are you in CA?
I and many others have got good used engines and parts from Dutch Auto Parts,
if it comes to that.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 09:09   #18
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If the OP lived close by, I'd be glad to give him a helping hand.

Did anyone notice the comment at or near the end of the original post (...burnt all of my oil)?

Here is a pic of "plugged" Intake.. This is a copy I got sometime ago. I'm sure back in the days and shortly thereafter of the 500ppm sulfur there were many of these being driven without a clue of the condition!

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Old January 17th, 2018, 11:04   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UhOh View Post
Intake clogging just doesn't happen overnight. Some other issue popped up and then lead to the (unfortunate) intake cleaning.
I agree. Less than competent initial diagnosis.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 11:53   #20
BobnOH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicrocc View Post
Ok this is awesome. Thanks for all the support! This looks like a very active, and resourceful forum. Ok 1st step is to do a compression test and then pull the head right? And I’m assuming if compression checks out ok I should check the turbo?

Does any have any recommendations on where I could get the best deals on engine parts / rebuild kit or a used engine?
I might go ahead and pull the intake, clean it and check adjacent ports for debris. Clean the intercooler, then proceed with compression check.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 12:40   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyBees View Post
Did anyone notice the comment at or near the end of the original post (...burnt all of my oil)?
That, and also the comment "He said this caused a huge gooey mess. He had to change the oil twice to get the goop out."

How does the goop from the intake get into the crankcase?
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Old January 17th, 2018, 13:49   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noob_tl View Post
That, and also the comment "He said this caused a huge gooey mess. He had to change the oil twice to get the goop out."

How does the goop from the intake get into the crankcase?
The "mechanic" probably poured seafoam in far too large a quantity into the intake. The liquid made it into the cylinder and some made it past the rings.

The liquid probably also caused some small hydro-lock events.


OP's mechanic broke this engine. As above, the intake should have come off to be cleaned. The intake, EGR and ports should have been cleaned in a way that introduced no carbon into the cylinders, and the intercooler should have been checked for residual oil after.

Had the "mechanic" done the above, OP's engine would be alive and well.

OP should take this "mechanic" to small claims court for the damage caused to the engine.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 14:44   #23
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Compression test, if it passes, move on to a leak down test, if that passes then start to inspect the turbo, If it passes then move forwards as your engine did not suffer much if any damage.

For the compression test, take out all the glow plugs CAREFULLY, read up on some treads here about glow plugs stripping and how to help prevent that, in a nut shell, mix up some 1:1 acetone and ATF and put a few drops on the glowplug threads area. If they come out easy, then ignore that part, if they don’t come out easy report back before you try and bust them loss.

Compression test:
Get the kit from harbor freight and the adapter for tdi glow plugs.
Write down all your results,
Do 3 tests on each cylinder and take the average value. They should all be the same values, someone can chime in on what to expect for good values. If you get one that has low values, put a few drops of motor oil into the glow plug hole. This will temporarily seal the piston rings for a test. If it makes good compression or much more than the failed value, your piston ring is failed, if that makes no difference, cracked piston or valve issue.
Now move on to leak down test. 50PSI into the fitting into the cylinder with the valves closes (pull the valve cover to verify. Now put your ear up to the exhaust pipe, then the intake, then the oil dipstick tube. If you hear air rushing in any of those then you have a bad valve, if it comes out the dipstick, cracked cylinder or blown piston rings. If air bubbles come out the coolant reservoir than head gasket failed. If any portion failed the leak down test, you’re pulling the head. If compression is good right off the bat and the leak down test shows no results then move to the turbo.
If the turbo has lots of oil in the exhaust pipe and you passed the leak down test, 99.9% you have a blown turbo.

Report back with results. Good luck, hope it’s not too bad.

I would also, just for kicks, get the timing belt inspected and your cam, flywheel and ip all at TDC and if one does not ling up, then this is probably the cause but would not explain the oil loss unless it damages a valve bad enough to dump oil. ITs easy to check the belt as you will have that all exposed when your doing the tests so its worth a look just for the heck of it, i dont foresee this being a problem based on what happened. I would not buy parts until you get this done. Spend $50 on the tools you need to test, have a friend loan you an air compressor.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 14:47   #24
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Its going to be difficult without pictures or a written contract or bill of sales from the "mechanic" i have dealt with small claims enough to know that unless you have proof that he did the work, your going to have a hard time getting any compensation. Whats done is done,

Life is worthless with out learning. Learning is usually done by making mistakes. The better the lesson, the more expensive the mistake.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 20:55   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windex View Post
The "mechanic" probably poured seafoam in far too large a quantity into the intake. The liquid made it into the cylinder and some made it past the rings.

The liquid probably also caused some small hydro-lock events.


OP's mechanic broke this engine. As above, the intake should have come off to be cleaned. The intake, EGR and ports should have been cleaned in a way that introduced no carbon into the cylinders, and the intercooler should have been checked for residual oil after.

Had the "mechanic" done the above, OP's engine would be alive and well.

OP should take this "mechanic" to small claims court for the damage caused to the engine.
Totally agree with the reenactment, BUT...

I wouldn't be comfortable making the statement that everything would have been fine had the mechanic been competent. Again, there were issues before the mechanic applied his ape hands to this car. Whether the engine was semi-toast before it got fully toasted OR there was only a minor issue and the mechanic ended up totally toasting it we do not know. This is why there needs to be some sort of forensics applied (by an independent, competent ALH mechanic) IF the owner wishes to seek compensation for any damages arising from this intake cleaning work.

Ruling: not enough data.
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Old January 17th, 2018, 22:31   #26
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If there were issues before the damage happened you cant blame it on the mec. He also drove 60 miles after ..it was something waiting to happen.
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Old January 20th, 2018, 17:48   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windex View Post

OP should take this "mechanic" to small claims court for the damage caused to the engine.

It is a friend of his but, might not be anymore.
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Old January 22nd, 2018, 19:52   #28
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I seriously doubt the situation is as dire as some claim. It might be, but it's unlikely.

The cylinder head has to come off. Without doing that, it's a bunch of guess-work. If he's really a friend, he will jump in there and help you figure this out.

Seafoam probably loosened up a plug of goop from the intake manifold and it dropped in a cylinder, usually #2 or #3, which can bend a valve and a rod. I seriously doubt it made all that mess in those pictures, And all the goop is difficult to to blow out.

I'll call this a novice mistake, but like I said, if he's really your friend, he won't leave you hanging. He can pull the head in about 3 hrs, with some instruction. Then you will know exactly what to do.

Let me know if I can be any assistance. This is my "daily cup 'o tea".
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Old February 3rd, 2018, 18:10   #29
Nicrocc
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So I haven’t made the time to pull the head off, but I let it run today and this was the result. Oil spilling out of the tail pipe. Could that have more than one culprit?
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Old February 3rd, 2018, 19:27   #30
love my tdi
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I have heard that a long block can be had for about 3000.
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