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TDI (Diesel) Emissions This is a discussion about emissions from TDI's. Pro's cons of Diesels (including biodiesel) effects on the environment and how they compare to Gasoline and other fuel sources for Internal combustion engines.

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Old February 9th, 2017, 17:06   #91
turbobrick240
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Turbo240, it doesn't give me any comfort knowing that carbon-neutral wood was once part of an ecosystem that someone chose to destroy. It's nice to have an academic discussion about wood being carbon neutral, but you really are missing the big picture.
I would respectfully disagree. As an organic farmer who has planted thousands of trees in my lifetime, uses PV generated electricity, and heats with non fossil fuels, I'd say that I probably have a much better handle on the big picture than most.
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Old February 9th, 2017, 17:26   #92
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Maybe your brother in law is a colossal jerk, but I wouldn't begrudge him for getting some use from wood that would otherwise go to waste.
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Old February 9th, 2017, 18:03   #93
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I would respectfully disagree. As an organic farmer who has planted thousands of trees in my lifetime, uses PV generated electricity, and heats with non fossil fuels, I'd say that I probably have a much better handle on the big picture than most.
Except that you advocate burning wood as heating fuel, even after it has already been pointed out (and you've agreed) that it isn't possibly sustainable to do so. Beyond that, I couldn't imagine how my local air quality would be like if even 10% of our city's households chose to burn wood to heat their homes. I have enough of a challenge trying to convince my neighbor from burning all kinds of "organic" tree clippings in his fire pit - sending plumes of smoke through mine, and other windows down my street.

My government has imposed a carbon tax on clean natural gas, essentially making it cost twice as much to heat our homes. This has spawned city folks to go out and buy wood stoves, and another industry that irresponsibly cuts down trees to meet this new and growing demand for fuel.

Yup, we respectfully disagree with each other. Notwithstanding responsible and sustainable forestry, wood belongs on living trees.
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Old February 9th, 2017, 18:19   #94
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Yeah, I was really thinking of the 80,000 acres of rainforest cleared per day that oilerlord referenced.
Growing up we called that the Jungle
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Old February 9th, 2017, 18:23   #95
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My government has imposed a carbon tax on clean natural gas.
The "dirty" little secret, all the name of "science". It is really about control and squeezing more money from peoples pockets.
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Old February 9th, 2017, 18:54   #96
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Except that you advocate burning wood as heating fuel, even after it has already been pointed out (and you've agreed) that it isn't possibly sustainable to do so. Beyond that, I couldn't imagine how my local air quality would be like if even 10% of our city's households chose to burn wood to heat their homes. I have enough of a challenge trying to convince my neighbor from burning all kinds of "organic" tree clippings in his fire pit - sending plumes of smoke through mine, and other windows down my street.
My government has imposed a carbon tax on clean natural gas, essentially making it cost twice as much to heat our homes. This has spawned city folks to go out and buy wood stoves, and another industry that irresponsibly cuts down trees to meet this new and growing demand for fuel.
Yup, we respectfully disagree with each other. Notwithstanding responsible and sustainable forestry, wood belongs on living trees.
I would certainly never agree that wood cannot be a sustainable energy source. In fact, I cited Sweden twice as a prime example of how it can be. Would it be practical, feasible, or sustainable for every human on earth to obtain every btu of energy from wood?- well, no. Those living trees are a wonderful thing- but they don't live forever. I'm sure there are a tremendous number of sensible Canadians who don't share your opinion on the horrors of wood heat. I feel we have strayed from the topic at hand- what the great pumpkin may or may not do regarding regulations.
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Old February 10th, 2017, 04:57   #97
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Trees do not live forever, no, but many species can outlive humans. And the carbon sequestered in their wood stays sequestered if the wood is used for something other than burning. All woody plants are essentially is airborne carbon collection devices. A 100 year old oak tree's entire "life" of doing this airborne carbon collection is undone literally in a matter of a few days or even hours if its wood is simply burnt. But that same oak tree's life's work is potentially made immortal if it is used to make lumber to build a structure of some kind. And then in theory the air stays free of that carbon collected.

Wood remains "carbon neutral" so long as the amount of it thriving on the planet stays in concert with the atmosphere's content of carbon dioxide, and that allows animals (and us humans, biologically speaking just a "smart" animal) to remain breathing. We need oxygen to allow our blood to work and rid our bodies of things we do not need. Plants, including (and especially) woody ones like trees, need that carbon to grow, and they do not need the excess oxygen.

The problem comes when too much oxygen-consuming carbon-producing mechanisms come on line, and not enough plants remain to offset that difference. That is why standing, living, healthy trees are so important. A dead or fallen and dead tree will decay and rot and eventually push that carbon back into the atmosphere anyway, by means of microbial decay. So a dead tree trunk rotting on the forest floor will not be any different than cutting it up and burning it, just that the time scale of the reintroduction of that tree's sequestered carbon will be increased dramatically in the latter. Which is why any wood I burn for heat in our farm house is almost always, probably 95% of the time, harvested from already fallen or maybe a dead-but-still-standing tree. And even the still standing ones I am very selective about as they are preferred habitats for a great many wild animals.

Wood is a natural resource, and should be properly and responsibly managed, and preserved/conserved whenever possible. Something I started doing not all that long ago was repurposing wood pallets for use into making furniture. I have made two entertainment centers, various end tables and shelves, a big table, and a few other items with wood from pallets. The big table I made from the giant oak pallets that the lifts in our new shop came on. Table must weigh 300+ pounds, LOL. But it is a sturdy one! And I would argue this pallet furniture "looks" neater than some mass-produced stuff you buy in the store, even if it is a little rustic and usually not perfectly uniform or square.

But, getting back to the general topic of this thread, I still feel strongly that the choices you make as an individual for yourself, your family, loved ones, etc. can collectively make a bigger positive difference than any well intentioned but often poorly written or executed regulations can. Still flabbergasted that a ~50 MPG Golf is "forbidden" but a 15 MPG giant pickup is perfectly fine. And the Ford F150 is once again the best selling single model vehicle in this country. Makes no sense, but I will keep driving my 50 MPG Golf every day (and keep my 15 MPG F150 parked at home unless I absolutely NEED to use it).
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Old February 10th, 2017, 06:51   #98
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Absolutely in agreement on all points above. As a Brit once said "Isn't it good, Norwegian wood?"
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Old February 10th, 2017, 07:40   #99
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You can also burn those pallets like any other wood. Most (not all) pallets are very green oak, so you may have to let the cut pallet wood cure before burning it. You also have to watch for nails and staples when cutting it. When I lived in Wisconsin, my wife would bring home pallets from the newspaper she worked for. I guess that we burned about three face cords of logs and a face cord of pallets that winter.

I don't use my fireplace now since I've probably only needed it about a half dozen times in 20+ years of living in Charlotte. The two times I did use it, it was so inefficient at heat generation that it made the house colder as all the heat went straight up. I've got the back of the couch in front of the thing now to give me more usuable floor space.
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Old February 10th, 2017, 11:19   #100
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Lots of folks burn pallets around where I live in central Maine too. I do really like the idea of repurposing them into furniture. In fact, I'm at my cousin's place in Austin right now, where she has a great patio table made from a pallet and recycled lumber from an old headboard left curbside. I'm not snobbish at all about what I burn- conifers, hardwoods, scrap, it all gives good heat. My favorite species to burn from my woodlot are white ash, black locust, sugar maple, and red oak. Though I burn more red maple than anything else. The only species I refuse to burn is boxelder. It never seems to dry right, and stinks to high heaven.
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Old February 10th, 2017, 12:17   #101
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Lots of folks burn pallets around where I live in central Maine too. I do really like the idea of repurposing them into furniture. In fact, I'm at my cousin's place in Austin right now, where she has a great patio table made from a pallet and recycled lumber from an old headboard left curbside. I'm not snobbish at all about what I burn- conifers, hardwoods, scrap, it all gives good heat. My favorite species to burn from my woodlot are white ash, black locust, sugar maple, and red oak. Though I burn more red maple than anything else. The only species I refuse to burn is boxelder. It never seems to dry right, and stinks to high heaven.
Have on hand 'bout 200 cubic feet of very dry Hickory

Used to burn in in the fireplace in the Great wall o' fire grate ~~ we got a positive heat return. But the clean up in a mess

We do now occasionally burn some in our 34 inch Fire Pit

As far as global warming goes ~~ the heat of wood that is burned is 100% equal to a rotting tree on he ground ~~ That is if the rotting tree does not get buried.

First law of conservation of energy??? ~~ Physics 2005 ~~ TU

Smoke particulates? ~~ don't know ~~ don't care
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Old February 10th, 2017, 12:39   #102
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Hickory is one of the best. I would absolutely burn that if it were available. I take full advantage of the wood ash I generate and use it as a liming agent/potassium source for my food crops.
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Old February 10th, 2017, 13:09   #103
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I'm sure there are a tremendous number of sensible Canadians who don't share your opinion on the horrors of wood heat. I feel we have strayed from the topic at hand- what the great pumpkin may or may not do regarding regulations.
I think we both dug in chasing the semantic. While the specific CO2 emission from burning nat gas is 50% less than burning wood, the math isn't as cut & dried (so to speak) considering the carbon sequestered, and if trees are planted in their place.

Time to let it go.
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Old February 10th, 2017, 14:48   #104
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No worries. Sometimes we all have to climb down out of our high castle.
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Old February 13th, 2017, 14:23   #105
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<snip>

and future standards could be bent along the curve. (mpg standards for example)

<snip>.
I'm all for great MPG

but as far as I am concerned the CAFE (in the furure) has gone over board to the MAX

Satisfied even with the MPG on wife's 2015 Toyota RAV4 LIMITED

Gas (here in Okieville) is relatively cheap. And she only drives 'bout 500 miles per month.

So there
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