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TDI Conversions Discussions on converting non TDIs into TDIS. More general items can be answered better in other sections. This is ideal for issues that don't have an overlap and are very special to swaping engines.

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Old November 2nd, 2019, 17:50   #31
GEFP
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Old November 14th, 2019, 19:13   #32
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Default Day 21

Today was a short day, as was yesterday. I am back and took tools over to the shop yesterday, but forgot a few things. Today I went over with a couple of other things. This is the problem worrying me right now:



You know this spot - it is beside the hump that is under the rear seat and over the fuel tank. There is this spot here beside the outer rail. If water draining from the bed gets in here, about the only place it can go is forward into the cab. Since that is going to be sealed off, then water would sit until it gets through the paint by osmosis and rusts out the pan.

Not good. So I've been trying to think of a good way to seal it off. There is one construction video where Mark Smith alludes to supplying a nice cover "in later kits". Mine is a "later kit", but I guarantee you there is no extra cover there. I didn't like the idea of filling the space with urethane foam, because those aren't fool proof, and when water gets in there it will slide down in between the foam and the pan and still eventually rust things out.

Also, the solution needs to provide a way to get your hand and a tool back there because there are 2 bolts on each side of the pan that you install in front of the first bed bar and connecting to the front wall and (mostly) covering the fuel tank access port. So you need to be able to get an allen wrench (5mm, oh joy) or a 13mm socket, one or the other depending on how you install the bolts.

I was waiting on doing the bed bars and installing the bed until I figured this out (due to the access that will be needed later). Tonight I started cutting a piece of cardboard into a pattern for some aluminum I could get my friend to cut for me since he has a lot of that kind of thing around, and a couple of scrap pieces would work perfect. Probably it would end up being the same 1/8" material that is already there. I was working on that, and figuring out that it would work best if I could bend it here and there to fit more nicely, and wouldn't it be better if it were much thinner.

And the light bulb finally clicked on.

It isn't structural, after all. And I have the perfect material in my own garage. Some roofing aluminum sheet - it comes on a roll, and I have plenty. I can rivet it to the outer brace that goes from the B pillar brace to the wheel well that is on the outside of the bed side and seal it up with plenty of black silicone, and it will be perfect.

Photos coming when I remember to get the stuff and take it to the shop. Yay!

Not much else happened tonight, but figuring that out was a good roadblock to have out of the way. It's too cold right now anyway. That's my excuse and I'm sticking to it. That room I have to work in is isolated from the rest of his shop so it doesn't get heated. Much. I need to hurry and finish this project. And in this cold, painting will be a unique problem all its own.

Cheers,

PH
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Old November 15th, 2019, 19:32   #33
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Default Day 22

Today I just did some drilling and started working on the aluminum sheet to keep the 'pit' from filling with water.



If you use a clamp to hold the 2 feet in place while you drill the holes, it works a lot better. Here you can see the 2 feet for one side of the bar under the bed. They are just a couple of 1/8" aluminum, 90* bend. You drill the base to set a few pop rivets to hold it in place. If you try to just hold 1 foot in place, it will try to walk all over the place. Instead, I suggest that you use some kind of clamp to hold it to the bar at the place where you're going to mount them. The bar gives you a place to clamp the feet, and it will keep them at the correct angle while you drill, as well as allow you to hold the bar to keep everything from walking around. It works quite well.

Drilling through the metal surface is no problem. You don't want to push the bit all the way through as you might hit something else, like the muffler, or other exhaust plumbing, or fuel plumbing. Just enough to penetrate the 1 layer of steel you need to get through.

I decided to get most of the holes drilled. I'll mount them tomorrow. I did try a couple of them to make sure the rivets will work. And on the driver's side, the drill was hitting the muffler, so it is a good thing I bought some shorter rivets than normally come with the kit. I think I'd rather not create a bunch of rattling.

Here's the results of the drilling, although it may not be terribly interesting.





Here is one of the sheets I'm going to use to seal off the sides over the rear seat ledge.



It is very thin, and was purchased several years ago for a roofing problem I had. Since it is so thin, it should be easy to work.

While the box of rivets guards the side wall, the sheet is sticking in the side and under the lower edge of the side wall.



Here I'm holding the brace in place that I haven't installed yet. The sheet of aluminum should be able to be placed from the bottom of that brace down under the side wall edge. It will form a nice slope so that any water, rain, spilled soda, or any other liquid should be able to drain through the seams and run down to the drain hole above the fuel tank.



This is the view from the other side so you can see how the sheet will peek under the sidewall.



This part is going to take a little time to trim into a good shape. I think I'll need to install that brace to be able to fit it into place. I'm not thrilled about doing it this way, but it will probably be best to install this drip shield then install the cover that goes at the front of the bed.

I think I will also need another sheet on the outside of the outside brace. The objective will be to provide a path for condensation to get outside of the seam that is next to the outside of the car. But for all this to work right, I'll probably need to fill the space in between the 2 sheets with some foam to prevent humid air from getting in there and filling that pit with condensation anyway. Closed cell urethane from a can should work. I will need to do some inspections periodically to make sure this scheme is working. If it doesn't, I'll have to think up something else I guess.

Tomorrow will be more fun as I'll have some time to get more done.

Cheers!

PH
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Old November 16th, 2019, 06:51   #34
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It's difficult to see from the pictures but would it be possible to drill a small hole in that void so that any water that got in could just drain out? My concern would be the longevity of any seal and how you could check to see if it was holding. My truck has a bunch of weep holes in and under the bed to let water drain before it collects and starts a problem.
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Old November 16th, 2019, 18:05   #35
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There is a place like that - you'd just poke the lowest spot. I think the Smyth guys avoided that because a simple hole in the best spot would drain right into the main structural rail on the outside of the car. I've been thinking about the same kind of thing. Even if you do put a shield like I'm showing, you will still get condensation on the braces and it would fill the 'pit' anyway. The only thing I can think of that might work is to drill a hole completely through both surfaces of the pan (there's 2 layers) then seal a small tube in place that would allow the water to drain out.

Given the downside of having water collect, I am thinking that I might need to do that anyway because I don't have much faith in filling the area with foam and not having that foam merely insulate condensing water from evaporating.

Grrr.....

Maybe the best thing to do is to check for any conduits like fuel lines and such and drill it anyway.

PH
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Old November 16th, 2019, 18:31   #36
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Default Day 23

Today was supposed to be a day where a lot of stuff would get done. Alas, a large number of untoward things happened, not the least of which was an event that leaves me needing a Montreal wheel. If anyone knows where there is a cheap one available close to Concord, NH, please let me know.

Anyway, mostly I ended up finishing up setting the footings for the cross bars. Most of the holes got drilled yesterday, so today was some drilling and many rivets being set. I used shorter rivets than supplied because there's stuff under and beside the floor that I thought would be best if it was not disturbed by long rivets sticking out too far. That is, the rivets supplied are 3/4" long - overkill for nearly all the points that are riveted.

Here's the details on bar #2.





On this (driver's) side, I had to "adjust" one of the feet (read: sand it down to match the level for the tops of the bars). You can do OK if the feet are too short by a bit by just drilling the hole for the long bolt that will support the bar in the correct spot. But if it is too tall, you'll either bend the bed extrusion(s) or have it loose in spots - generally it would turn out screwy.

Here's the detail on the driver's side of bar #3. Since the rear foot goes sideways instead of down to the floor, I beat it up so it would fit nicely on the curved fender well.



Here's the right side.



This side is OK, but the front side foot doesn't have a lot of footprint.



As you can see from this vertical shot, the foot only has purchase on about 1/3 of the possible area. I don't think that is structurally sound. Maybe it is OK, but I'd rather feel like I won't have to do something later, so I made up a doubler to rivet on the side like the rear foot, just to reinforce the provided foot. It is really nice to have a friend that has a metal fabrication shop so that useful scrap aluminum is readily available. In this case, it is a 2 inch 1/8" thick aluminum angle. Just about perfect, I'd say.



So when the hole is drilled for the suspension bolt, I'll have multiple layers instead of just one. Yiha.

I didn't drill the center holes for the long bolts to finalize all this as it was dark and getting colder and I needed to get back home to finish up one of the unscheduled tasks that hit us today. I think Murphy is having a good laugh at me today.

More fun ahead!

Cheers,

PH
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Old November 19th, 2019, 19:15   #37
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Default Day 24 Drill and mount bars 2 & 3

Today I was able to drill and mount bars 2 & 3. This completion allows the mounting of the wheel well covers and the bed.

I still haven't decided on what to do about the pits beside the front wall. I checked to see if you could just drill through. The distance between the lower surface of the bottom of the car body and the most likely place for a drain hole is 4 3/4". This is also in the vicinity of the reinforcement for the rear jacking point. There's other structure running through there as well, such as a couple of seams and the outside rail of the unibody. So maybe trying to drill through isn't such a great idea.

On the other hand, there's a port at the rear of the door opening. It appears to be some kind of drain where water could exit from that port and just run out to the ground, since it would be just below the lower door's seal. That might be doable, if I can figure out how to make the right connection.

Anyway, to get the bars mounted correctly, you need a long straight edge that can span from bar 1 to bar 4. Both of these bars are bolted via holes in the side walls that were drilled by Smyth. Since they're cnc machined (a cnc plasma cutter did the deed) I figured I can rely on them. Kinda hard to change things if I didn't.

Using the straight edge, you check the height of the feet to ensure they aren't too high, and reduce that if any of them are. Then you use the straight edge to give a reference for the bar and clamp it. Once the clamp is in place, you can drill the hole (5/16") for the long bolt that will hold the bar in place. You basically do it by best guestimate - I don't know of a good fixture you could use to get the drill perfectly lined up. You can't pre-drill it because if you do, you're sure to be a few millimeters off. So do it in place, by hand, and hope for the best.

The feet are 1/8" thick aluminum, and the C channel that makes up the bar is a little thicker than that. I would recommend if you do one of these to be sure and drill from the backside of the C channel. The reason is that the C channel will make a lot of chips. There is a small piece of wood/laminate in place to fill in the center of the C channel inbetween the feet. This gives both feet a good clamping surface. If you drill from the front, all the excess chips from the C channel don't really have a good exit (you think a 4" curly cue of aluminum is going to run neatly up the drill bit flute? Ha!), so the chips will get packed into and chew up the inside of the spacer. That would weaken it, and it slows the drilling operation down. Trust me, it works better to drill the backside of the C channel first. Or rather, go from that direction. I drilled a pilot hole with the 3/16" bit and then finished with the 5/16" bit for the final hole.

After doing the drilling, and tightening up the bolts, then cleaning up, the results are in.









So now I'm ready for the front tray, the wheel well covers, and the bed floor. The taps for the bed floor mounting bolts have arrived, and they're waiting for me at the shop. I just have to figure out the drain problem.

Cheers!

PH
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Last edited by Powder Hound; November 19th, 2019 at 19:19.
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Old November 20th, 2019, 19:36   #38
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Default Day 25

I've had it. It is time to pull the trigger on something. I'm not going to be able to drill a drain hole, and there isn't much else to consider, so I decided to fill in the gaps at seams with silicone RTV, fill with foam, go back in a day or two after the foam has cured and smooth it out, then seal it with POR so that any water getting in there can roll down to the outside and out over that seam at the door.

First I mounted the little piece that is provided to make a hole that isn't on the bottom where the wires are. You lift up the wires that go forward, stick the piece in place, and rivet. You can pre-drill this one because there are little pips made by the plasma cutter to locate the holes in both pieces (the other piece being the front wall of the bed).

You then rivet the small cord suspension pieces from inside the cab, so that the ugly part of the rivet stays hidden in the bed sides.

Then you shake up the urethane foam in a can purchased from the friendly local home improvement store and slowly 'spray' (ooze?) it in place. I ran my hot air gun at the same time on the foam, hoping to help the bubbles remain small. Actually, I think the best way will end up being to only lay down a small amount of foam at a time because inside a large mass of foam that doesn't cure quickly because of a lack of moisture, the bubbles combine to make a less than optimal foam mass. We'll see if it gets ugly when I trim it back after it hardens.

From inside the cab:


From outside, bed side. You can see the wires as they lay on the bottom, but I'll lift them up to hopefully stay on top of the foam.



The driver's side, with foam:



You can also see the markings for the wheel well cover. I did this because you must rivet from this side, and it is much easier if you know where to drill.

Another view of the same thing:



The rear portion of the bed side with the cover markings.



The solid line is about at the top of the cover, and the dotted line is the bottom of the flange. The flange gives you 1.5" to use as a glue and rivet space.

The wheel well cover, loosely in place because it isn't riveted.



A vertical of the flange of the wheel well cover. I don't think the less than perfect flange (2 different angles - this isn't because of camera angle) will cause trouble.



So things are coming together. I decided not to bolt in the tray until the foam and drainage work is complete because it would be a little easier this way.

Cheers,

PH
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Last edited by Powder Hound; November 20th, 2019 at 19:38.
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Old November 21st, 2019, 20:01   #39
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Default Day 26

I have a few puzzles to work out, so I put the other wheel well cover in place and took a look at things.





So if you look at the above 2 photos, they are the tail and then the front of the passenger side. The rear is fine, but the front has that gap in front of the 1st bar. What should be going on is the tray should be bolted in, and the tab on the front of the wheel well cover slides down into the gap between the tray and bar #1.

The other side shows much the same fitment, except I located on the bar and let the rear extend just a little over the last bar (#5) . So everything is OK as far as sizing goes - both wheel well covers are the same size, and the bed is measuring the same side to side.



The above is the tail of the driver's side that is located right on bar #1 like it is supposed to be.

What I need to do at this point is to go check the videos and make sure of how it is all supposed to fit. I might need to make some adjustments; if so, not much material will be removed.

I also ran an idea across my friend, and he thinks it would be a great idea to weld a seam along the top of the cover where you can't really rivet because the car's body work is left standing there. I like that idea. I'll rivet on the sides to make sure the cover is properly located and we'll clamp it as well.

Then there is the foam I left yesterday. I was thinking that I rushed it too much. I was right.



This is the right side. I had forgotten to fasten that bolt at the bottom, so I had to dig out some foam to get enough clearance to insert and tighten the bolt. I was thinking that the silicone might not be cured yet due to lack of exposure to air. That was indeed the case. Also, in the cold and lack of air (actually, the moisture in the air that the foam needs to cure) maybe 2" of foam cured, and under that, the foam collapsed and the resulting urethane was a gooey mess.

Moral of the story is that if you are going to fill it in the way I did, then you apply as much silicone as you want, but let it fully cure before you apply foam over it. Then apply the foam in amounts no more than about 1 inch before letting it cure, then go back and fill in more allowing for each layer to cure. I should have done this starting last Monday!

I am also sure there's a few of you smart guys out there that probably figured this would happen, and now I'm one of you as well. You just can't rush some things.

There's a few things I need to do tomorrow, so I won't be working again until Saturday.

Cheers!

PH
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Old November 23rd, 2019, 19:08   #40
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Default Day 27 (a)

I'm doing today in 2 parts, because I have more than 10 photos.

I started out today doing various small tasks, some I have skipped over and others just because. The first thing was to look for a brace, #22 on the packing list called "tailgate brace/adjustment plates". They were mentioned in the video, but I couldn't find them. So I made a direct effort to go through all the stuff in the small parts box, and there they were, hiding under a bunch of small parts. Who'd've thunk??

They are there to freeze the gap between the top of the tailgate and the side wall where the striker is mounted. The bottom is pretty much fixed due to the hinges and the short bar that is bolted in place, so you put this corner piece in to ensure you maintain the gap all the way up. If it varies, you'd be really surprised how much something like that sticks out.



And of course, the video only shows 3 rivets so I had to do some overkill.

Then it is on to carving up cured foam. I used a hacksaw blade and it works surprisingly well. I wanted to shape it so that a nice surface is formed for allowing drips and condensate to drain out the side. I'll have to apply sealant when the general shape is correct, but this is a good start. You can see the pit I dug out to bolt in the bottom bolt, and now the stuff that was in the bottom is mostly cured. It is still a little soft, but I'm not worried about it still being liquid.



And there's other places I'll fill in with more foam as well.

This is one of the gaps under the corner of the rear seat. There's a hoop there, and a hole next to it that I filled in somewhat with foam, but it didn't really go well. There's another on the other side (well, a few inches away). That one I left the ugly foam and have covered it with silicone to seal it off. This one I covered with a thin aluminum piece I just cut out. I used the aluminum roofing material I was going to use on the sides of the rear seat, but as you can see above, I decided that wasn't going to work well and went with the foam and silicone. So the roofing material is getting used anyway. I just trim to fit, a little oversize, line the bottom with a generous bead of silicone, and press into place.

Here's the bottom of the spare tire well. I had left out 2 of the plugs as seemed to be done in the videos, but such large holes didn't sit well with me.

If you look in between the 2 plug holes I covered with aluminum, you'll see a small black spot which is a drain hole that VW already provided. I figured that will most likely be sufficient. If I left the large holes open, Murphy would probably find a way to fill the entire well, other than what is displaced by the tire and other hardware, with sand, so I'm feeling better now.

Some of the drain plugs I just filled with silicone so as not to provide swimming holes to the local fauna.

And just to be different, the plug was in place, but I covered it with an aluminum cap instead of filling with silicone. After all, variety is the spice of life, is it not?

This is the 'bucket' on the passenger side, outside the side wall of the bed in back of the rear wheel. There are 2 plugs on this side, but only 1 on the driver's side. Both of the plugs pretty much fell apart, which is why they were both open and needed covers. I'll punch a hole in the small one on the outside before I mount the quarter panel. Same on the driver's side.

And this is why I'm looking for a Montreal wheel. They seem to be pretty unusual, so I'm not holding my breath.
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Last edited by Powder Hound; November 24th, 2019 at 05:40.
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Old November 23rd, 2019, 19:27   #41
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Default Day 27 (b)

Some other tasks. The big plastic hold down molding for the spare tire didn't work too well - I ended up using a wrench on it when I cleaned it out in the beginning. Today it was time to do something about it.


It is a great thing to be working next to a very well equipped metal shop, whose owner happens to collect a lot of stuff. I asked if he had a short piece of rod to weld onto the bolt, and he came up with this. So I notched the plastic, he welded the piece, and I pressed it right in. I'll add some glue, maybe a little dab of windshield adhesive when I get to that point, but as of now, the spare tire hold down is pretty much fixed.



Now, after doing the foam contouring I showed earlier, I was able to apply some more silicone to the inside parts of the voids that need filling. I am OK at this point to mount the front tray, and I can finish off that void fill in the next few days before I start on the quarter panels.

In the meantime, I was able to mount the front tray. Sort of. When it comes down to it, you can reach around and tighten the side bolts by yourself, but those bolts on the front wall (5 of them) will require some creative body positioning, or 2 people. I'll go for 2 people. Right now, the side bolts have nuts on, but they aren't completely tightened, and the front wall bolts have no nuts on them at all, but all of it works to correctly position the tray so that I can correctly position the fender covers and start working on riveting them in place.

But first, you have to make sure they fit. I trimmed a thin wedge off the back of the driver's side - it was 1/8" on the inside tapering to nothing at the outside. The right one will need a generous 1/8 all the way across, as well as a little trimming in the corner.



And when you are trimming aluminum, sometimes a power tool may not be the right choice as it is too easy to go too far. I took 20 minutes to trim this back, but I'd rather do that than have some wierd waves in the corner.



So here it is, ready to trim a little more off the left fender cover, then start drilling and riveting some more. Oh, and tightening some bolts as well. And sealing the foam. And...

Another view of the same thing...



I actually feel like I got some good work done today. I could have done more, but I took 2 hours out to mount and balance some tires to replace the (3/4) set on my daily driver, because I hate driving with the spare. Looks screwy. And it is an all season spare, while the other 3 are snows. It probably wouldn't be a good thing if it snows right now*, so now I just gotta change the wheel set.

Cheers!

PH

P.S. TDIClub says I have 10 photos in the first post. I counted only 9, so I guess a smiley counts as a photo. Interesting...

PPS - Oh, one other thing. Technically, you can unbolt and remove the front tray at a later time if you really needed to. I can't think of a reason why that would be necessary, and after having to carefully hammer it into place (rubber hammer, but you still have to work it) and work very hard to set those bolts, and then not being able to do enough with the 5 bolts along the front wall all by yourself, I don't think I will ever be removing that pan unless there is a complete disaster. Seriously, it is going in, and it ain't coming out. Period.

Cheers again!

PH

*-we got rain, slush, freezing rain, and snow on top of it all within 10 hours of writing the above. Pretty much the entire spectrum of precipitation, in the worst combination possible. If I make it out and back home safe, well, it pays to live righteously!
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Last edited by Powder Hound; November 24th, 2019 at 05:46.
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Old November 25th, 2019, 19:09   #42
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Default Day 27(c)

Today some other stuff came up, so not much building.

But I did get asked about a detail on the tailgate, so I ran over to the shop and snapped a couple of photos to show details.

Specifically, this:



This shows how the long hook piece fits into the side catches on the tailgate, and this:



shows how those pieces can be bolted to the center handle using the supplied bolts, washers, and nut that you can't see.

And if it isn't obvious, you have to twist those long hooks yourself so that there's a 90 degree twist. See how it twists:



And that's how it works.

Also, I was able to confirm that Murphy is still working at my house, and he's found the shop. Ugh.

Case in point, at my house: my wife has a winter beater. It is a 2003 1.8T Jetta. Auto of course, as she is determined never to use her left foot when driving except possibly to tap her foot when she's keeping time with music. So after work today, I installed the winter shoes, and I was going to warm it up by driving to the shop. Not so. No reverse. Oh, <bleep>. I hate automatics.

My daily driver (the 4-dr Golf I've had for 20 years, bought new) is leaking diesel from the pump. It definitely isn't from the quantity adjuster, not from any of the distribution valves or fuel lines, not from the return line, so it looks like either the back side from the pump head gasket or one of the ports for the advance solenoid or the cold start solenoid, underneath where it is impossible to see. Ugh. I will probably be fixing that on Turkey day.

He (Murphy) found the shop. How so? Last Saturday I was looking for the 120* countersink I'll be needing next when it comes time to mount the fiberglass parts (rear bumper cover, quarter panels, and rear window surround) and a few other things. Couldn't find it at home, and not at the shop. So today I ordered a new one. Murphy's Law of Lost Things (actually a corollary of the basic Law) is this: if you lose something, you will not be able to find it until the need is gone or you replace it. Borrowing someone else's won't work because you have to give it back, and in this case if you borrow something you might lose that one as well. Anyway, at the shop to take the above photos, I was going to leave, and then I decided to prove the law. Since I ordered a new one, I found the original in 3 minutes.

That <bleep> <bleep> <bleep>ing Murphy needs to give me a break!

Cheers,

PH
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Last edited by Powder Hound; November 25th, 2019 at 19:25.
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Old November 26th, 2019, 19:57   #43
Powder Hound
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Location: Conkud, New Hampshiyuh, USA
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Default Day 28

I went over tonight to install the fender covers. I ended up being half right.

I used the suggested method of lining up the covers, drawing a line on the side wall, removing the cover, then drilling holes in the side wall. That way you have holes in one side properly located, and you can then install the cover, drill through the cover using the holes you already have, and rivet it down. The flanges on the cover are about 1 1/2 inches wide, so you drill the holes about 3/4" from your line. This method works quite well.

I decided to use an adhesive along with the rivets. This is because a big chunk of the top of the fender cover can't be riveted because of the structure over the wheel wells left behind. The downside is that working with the adhesive isn't a lot of fun. I bought a Dupont product used for windshields. Since it is cold, that adhesive is really viscous, and really hard to squirt using a calking gun. The nozzle provided is lots larger than the usual calking tube, too, so you either buy a specific gun for this product or grind out your existing gun. I chose the latter.

But it is so hard to squeeze out of the product tube I ended up unscrewing the huge nozzle and using a kraft stick (looks like a popsicle stick that has been notched) to scoop it off the tube and spreading it on the side wall. The only problem is that it is hard to gauge how much to spread on, and if your cover doesn't fit perfectly, then you'll smear it around trying to get that cover back into correct position.

Expect to work on those covers a bunch before you commit to rivet them in place. Mine (driver's side, didn't get to the right side) kept lifting the rear. And both of them don't like to cozy up to the side walls perfectly. You'll probably have to just force it as parts of the covers are welded, and it isn't easy to weld them perfectly if you don't have a super duper jig. And even if you do, it might change shape after you pull the finished piece out of the jig. I'm just saying this because doing a large metal piece out of bent and welded sheet is a veritable art form, so don't be surprised if you see some strange lines.

Anyway, I got the driver's side down, so I should be able to get the passenger side down tomorrow.

No photos - forgot the camera. Sigh...

Cheers!

PH
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Old November 27th, 2019, 18:37   #44
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Default Day 29

Tonight I installed the right fender cover.



Having the clamps available in the metal shop was quite beneficial, because when you riveted the front corner, the rear corner decided to move out and up about 1 inch in each direction. The large vise-grips clamped them down nicely. I do know it would have been much less fun without them.



I used the same adhesive as last night on the driver's side, but this time I applied a lot less, and was able to complete the install without squishing it out the external seam. Looks lots better that way.



So I had everything trimmed up at the tail, just right, and now after install they are off a bit. Trimming in place is about 10 times harder than if you can just pull the piece out and work on it. In place, it isn't in a good location leverage and tool manipulation wise, and there's other aluminum surfaces right there that you don't want to grind on. Ugh.



Next is tying those tail ends down to the last bar with the doubler pieces and flush rivets. Should be fun.

Enjoy Turkey Day everyone!

Cheers!

PH
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You always pay for what you get. Sometimes you get what you pay for.
It is called dope because it does make you dumb.
Thinking outside the box is difficult for some. They're afraid they'll fall off the edge of the box and be lost to oblivion.
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Old November 29th, 2019, 17:47   #45
Powder Hound
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Location: Conkud, New Hampshiyuh, USA
Fuel Economy: pretty freakin' good.
Default Day 30

I was back at work at my day job today. I spent yesterday trying to replace the pump head seal on my 4-dr Golf, but I messed up and will have to give it a try again in the morning. As it is, I decided the wind is blowing too cold to do anything tonight, so I went over to the shop to see what I could get done. It would be without most all my tools since I left those at home while working on the pump.



The first thing I did was apply a bunch of white RTV silicone to the top of the foam I had in this space.

Then I took a look at the tailgate to see what needs adjusting because one side latches and the other does not. I see where to fix things, but again, my tools are at home.

So I decided to lay out the bed floor panels and start measuring to see what all is needed to fasten it down.



The blue tape on the bed sides is so that when the panels are laid down, I will still be able to see where to drill for the bolts that fasten the floor panels in place.

I had a photo of the tailgate end, but the camera did not focus properly. This is the front wall end. You can see that there is a little trimming that must happen as the panels aren't perfectly square.



All in all, I don't expect it to be a terrible job, just time consuming. If all goes well with the pump in the morning, I'll get to it by noon, or maybe early afternoon.

Cheers!

PH
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