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Old May 25th, 2018, 10:53   #8
SilverGhost
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Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Old Hickory, TN. Settling here...
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Originally Posted by Riker View Post
From what I was told by the import mechanic down the street is that processed WVO is more viscous than normal fuel if you try to run it through a normal fuel pump, it will quickly leak all over the place. I also thought that the conversion kit for a 2002 Golf included a seperate tank and a toggle switch, the idea being that one starts their vehicle on normal diesel and then switches it over to WVO after about 15 minutes.

My understanding of converting a 2002 Golf to run on WVO is that it is a 3-part process: Buy/build/learn how to use a WVO processor, intstall a conversion kit (which heats up the WVO fuel line I think), install the higher-viscosity pump.

I didn't know that WVO and biodiesel were different. I'm getting different information from almost everyone I talk to, so any clarification would be super helpful. The viton seals info was awesome (thanks Phil and atc!) My Golf needs a new fuel pump anyway, so if I can just buy the normal one, that would be helpful, but they are expensive, so if anyone has done this conversion or knows someone who has, I'm all ears! thanks!
Highlight section - I would hesitate to recommend WVO (Waste Vegetable Oil) to anyone who makes this statement.

WVO is a feed stock that can be refined to make Bio Diesel. Much the same way crude oil is refined into Diesel and gasoline.

Heating the WVO is part of the system you install so that the stock injection pump will work.

I would recommend, from some of the statements you have made, that you start off with some BioD. Drive the car while you research the WVO to death (philngrayce is a great person to ask) before making the plunge.

Jason
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