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-   -   Oil in the turbo air intake, oil catch can? (http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=496474)

sptsailing February 10th, 2019 18:06

Oil in the turbo air intake, oil catch can?
 
So my 2006 BRM is running great, except it stinks. Upon investigation, I have found that the turbo air intake is dripping small amounts of oil onto both the exhaust tube leading the the oil cooler and the exhaust pipe itself. It used to drip on an air tube leading from the exhaust manifold to the air filter housing, but as I live in Florida, I had removed all of these cold weather parts. My guess is that at a minimum, I need to replace the rubber o-ring at the connection between the connector and the turbo, but I am puzzled as to the amount of oil traveling from the cylinder head cover to the intake air assembly. Is this normal? The lower charge air pipe had no appreciable levels of oil in it other that a film. The oil present in the air intake clearly reveals that the offending oil originates from the cylinder head cover (valve cover), so I am guessing that an oil catch can could cure my current odor issues.

I solicit comments from members having solved this particular issue, and am also interested in hearing about successful oil catch can installations on BRM engines.

The amount of oil loss from the crankcase appears to be almost negligeable. but the small amount hitting the hot exhaust parts do create odors. I am going to replace the rubber o-ring that contacts the turbo from the air intake, as it is the original, as that may actually solve the issue.

kdawg89 February 10th, 2019 20:06

Oil in the turbo air intake, oil catch can?
 
I think every BRM on the road probably leaks from there, itís a problematic union.

I wonder if there is an oil separator or anything in the valve cover that could fail and cause excess oil to go into the intake?

I think IDParts sells some kind of oil catch thingy made by Mann Hummel, might be called a provent or something like that.



Found it. https://www.idparts.com/mann-provent-200-p-2334.html


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relumalutan February 11th, 2019 06:09

Yep, MANN Provent seems to be the best solution. I just bought one but I have the following concerns regarding installing it:
1. Location: probably the best would be to somehow attach it to the oil filter housing. Unfortunately for me, I already have a dieselgeek oil bypass already installed in that place. One member has installed his in the driver side behind the fog light cover. I am still debating where to install mine, I am taking in consideration installing it behind the engine block.
2 Freezing temperatures leading to clogging (I live in MI). I ahve found a company that makes a sort of electric blanket for MANN Provent to keep it warm while the engine runs, I am still researching a option to keep the hose leading to and from the Provent warm.



Quote:

Originally Posted by kdawg89 (Post 5482794)
I think every BRM on the road probably leaks from there, it’s a problematic union.

I wonder if there is an oil separator or anything in the valve cover that could fail and cause excess oil to go into the intake?

I think IDParts sells some kind of oil catch thingy made by Mann Hummel, might be called a provent or something like that.



Found it. https://www.idparts.com/mann-provent-200-p-2334.html


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


sptsailing March 15th, 2019 19:44

So continuing to address my car's issue, I have found the suggestions of Franko6 to be the very most helpful. I have changed my driving style to reflect his suggestions, and even though I was unable to completely solve the oil drip onto hot pipes completely, I reduced it enormously by following his suggestions. The following is a quote from an email I received from him regarding this topic:

"
I've found that the BRM has a regular and aggravating oil leak from the plastic elbow that attaches directly to the outlet of the turbo. It is a green Viton o-ring, which I wish were about .2mm thicker. The boost pressure will make it leak enough oil to make a mess and worse, it falls onto the cabin heater's hoses, causing them to swell or otherwise, go bad.


Until I find the correct o-ring, which seems like it's not going to happen, my alternative fix is to remove the plastic elbow, take out the o-ring. then thoroughly clean the elbow. Wipe a thin layer of High Temp RTV in the location where the o-ring seats. Let the RTV completely cure and reinstall the elbow, with the o-ring back in place. The extra layer of RTV will make the seal a bit more difficult to push into place and that is good. It will stop leaking.


As for items such as the Provent or the Alfdex, I did try to use a Provent. I found it awkward and messy. The cost, in my opinion, is high and the true value, low. I took the thing off and it's laying on a shelf around here somewhere.


The idea of taking that goop you separated out of the crank case vent and putting it back into the crankcase is not a good idea, in my opinion. It is exhaust gasses, water and a little bit of oil. The issue with the intake manifold will not be cured, as that is as much or more, the exhaust gasses which carry soot into the engine. I think the CCV that is in place is adequate, if the engine is driven correctly.


Every TDI engine produces some intake debris. The amount that will coat your intake manifold is much more to do with driving habits and engine rpm than any device you can put on it. In our own personal cars; one a '02 Jetta with the ALH and an '05 Passat with the Pumpe Duese BHW, we have never cleaned either the intake on the Jetta, which currently has over 250,000 miles or the Passat, which has about 140,000. The reason for our 'lack of cleaning' is we drive the engine in the appropriate rpm, all the time. This means down-shifting if the rpms will fall below 2000.


Although I realize there is a power band that is fairly healthy around 1500 rpm, this engine does two things at those rpm's. 1) That is 'lugging', which damages rings and pistons with premature wear. and 2) more incomplete burn and a higher level of blow by (exhaust going past the piston rings) will occur.


An example of my driving technique for city driving: at 35 mph, I will downshift to 3rd gear and keep rpm's above 2200 rpm. Although the engine will pull the vehicle in 5th gear and somewhere around 1,000 rpm, that is what causes your issue. Don't do it.


In my Passat, with the Tiptronic transmission, the transmission is set at the factory to upshift too quickly. In order to make it properly shift, you have to 'put your foot into it', as under very light acceleration, you will find shift points well below the 2000 rpm I suggest. Instead of driving the engine aggressively to meet proper shift points, I will paddle shift quite often, most particularly when driving in the city. Now, I don't mind if the engine is running 1500 rpm as you idle down the street, but if you jump on the accelerator to speed up, paddle shift down so you accelerate in the proper rpm range. Your intake will stay cleaner and your engine will last longer."


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