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-   -   Wiring diagrams (http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=245170)

hughgb April 21st, 2009 06:11

radio wiring
 
Does anyone know the colour code to determine what wire goes where, ie: red -power, Grenn - ground, Etc. I have a 99 Jetta TDI diesel. Thanks.

Matthew_S April 21st, 2009 12:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by hughgb
Does anyone know the colour code to determine what wire goes where, ie: red -power, Grenn - ground, Etc. I have a 99 Jetta TDI diesel. Thanks.

This link gives a really good description of what the different colors mean.

http://lennysvw.com/WIRINGid.htm

Sip'n Diesel April 21st, 2009 13:14

whitedog you will likely be receiving a Nobel Peace Prize within a couple of years... I am not good with this (electronics/wiring) type of thing at all. I bought one of those cheap-o multimeter/voltmeters awhile back and I still haven't learned how to use it properly and how to avoid frying things and especially avoiding self-electrocution:o:eek:

this thread gives me motivation to start learning, because it's only a matter of time until the electrical gremlins decide to pay me a visit. your idea is a very good one, because it does take a lot of searching/flipping to find something specific (especially if you are me)

:cool:OTOH I have become pretty good with a MityVac, which I purchased with the multimeter

Lug_Nut April 21st, 2009 15:35

I personally prefer the "E-plan" type schematics as the Bentley manual reproduces to the 'overview' type being considered here.
The E-plan is basically a 'ladder' diagram laid over on it's side. Positive or + voltage is on top and progresses down from "hot" to switched to LRR through consumers and finally down the page to ground or - voltage at the bottom.
My 1969 Sonett has the overview format, and even with it's simple enough wiring it is barely comprehensible to me.

whitedog April 21st, 2009 16:30

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lug_Nut
I personally prefer the "E-plan" type schematics as the Bentley manual reproduces to the 'overview' type being considered here.
The E-plan is basically a 'ladder' diagram laid over on it's side. Positive or + voltage is on top and progresses down from "hot" to switched to LRR through consumers and finally down the page to ground or - voltage at the bottom.
My 1969 Sonett has the overview format, and even with it's simple enough wiring it is barely comprehensible to me.

Cool. So if I get stuck understanding something, expect a note. :D

Ookpic April 21st, 2009 19:16

Had a little time tonight to work on this. All symbols are now imported and here is a draft. It is clickable to get larger version.

http://i41.tinypic.com/24pf5sn.jpg

LMK what you think.

whitedog April 21st, 2009 20:15

That looks great.

The only thing that I see from a quality viewpoint is the wire connection numbers in the CCM should be right at the point where the wire comes in rather than in the corners.

I like having the fuse number and amperage right at the fuse. On the one that I am working on now, I have them just as a reference number but I'll change that.

Also, I will be going to putting the ground points right at the device rather than running them all to the bottom. I will also have the location of each of those ground points.

And I need to show the ground for the CCM.

I'll go over it one more time and show where I could have done better in my drawing and I think that it would be GTG.

whitedog April 26th, 2009 11:00

Here is another version for the >2000 JGB. We still need some feedback on some things.

http://pics.tdiclub.com/data/500/med...art_system.jpg

HERE is a PDF of the reference numbers. this will show you where ground #42 is and what device "B" is and where to find connection A32, etc.

After working on another diagram, it's obvious that Matthew was right about putting the grounds right at the devices rather than running them down to the bottom as a common ground so thanks for that.

The question up for discussion is how to handle different engines/transmissions/years/models. In this example, I have the automatic and manual transmission on the same page. Would it be better to have separate pages for each one, or the same page with all applicable scenarios (e/t/y/m) pointing to the same page?

I would appreciate the feedback, especially the bad and the ugly. The good feedback mostly feeds the ego and I'll skip that, but thanks. :)

Lug_Nut April 27th, 2009 04:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by whitedog
Cool. So if I get stuck understanding something, expect a note. :D

...and expect a reply in return.

oilhammer April 27th, 2009 04:46

Why on Earth are you trying to reinvent the wheel? VAG's factory diagrams are simple and easy to use. I just wish there were not so many mistakes in them, but as far as layout the track-style (or 'ladder' type as Lug Nut calls them) is pretty good.

VAG went to these WAY back in the early '70s due to increasing complexity, so you are attempting to go backwards???? :confused:

whitedog April 27th, 2009 06:12

It took at least 9 pages to find all of the components and wires for the A/C system on the 98 Beetle. That is not easy to follow. I have it all on one drawing.

oilhammer April 27th, 2009 06:27

But I prefer (and most professionals prefer) to see ALL the wiring, since typically when you are looking at a diagram it is to find a problem. And so often electrical problems manifest themselves in ways that tie seemingly unrelated circuits to one another.

For instance, did you know that on a 2002 Jetta wagon if you remove one fuse, not only will the A/C not work, but the parking brake warning indicator won't work and the headlight DRL circuit won't work. If you just were looking at the A/C wiring, and not the rest of the stuff, you would NEVER be able to figure out how those 2 systems are related.

Troubleshooting electrical problems without all the info would be like troubleshooting a brake noise without driving the car.

I think your project would be helpful to some folks for the purpose of training or understanding the theory behind automotive electronics, but there are already plenty of textbooks for such pursuits.

But for actual troubleshooting, no way. I think your efforts would be better spent illustrating how to actually use the diagrams, which I for one find pretty easy and straightforward. But I have to, my career depends on it. ;)

CoolAirVw April 27th, 2009 07:55

I think having a database of schematics on your website would generate lots of traffic and be excellent for business.

I think it would be a good business move.

With regards to "what else is on the circuit" a simple dead end branch on a circuit that ends with ".... to a/c clutch" or "...to park brake indicator" or "... to headlight DRL" would be sufficient, and of course on the a/c clutch scehmatic it would need a dead end branch that said.. "...to park brake indicator".

DanG144 April 27th, 2009 08:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by oilhammer
...

For instance, did you know that on a 2002 Jetta wagon if you remove one fuse, not only will the A/C not work, but the parking brake warning indicator won't work and the headlight DRL circuit won't work. If you just were looking at the A/C wiring, and not the rest of the stuff, you would NEVER be able to figure out how those 2 systems are related...

;)

Brian, which fuse would that be? (I will have to wait until later to look at the schematic.)

Dan

oilhammer April 27th, 2009 08:38

I believe it was the 7.5A #5 fuse in the interior fuse block, IIRC.


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